How successful people view time - Deepstash

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Why There is No Such Thing as Time Management

How successful people view time

The world’s most successful people give 100% of their time to whatever it is they are doing.

They are hyper-focused and relentlessly present with what’s directly in front of them: at work, at the gym, with their family.

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