Quote by Tim Metz - Deepstash

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“When you have less time available for work, you have to make better choices about what to work on (and what not to).”

TIM METZ

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

It means absolutely not tolerating distractions and producing monumental quality and quantity in a very short time. 

This is how you can complete far more with focused efforts than unfocused efforts with far more time.

The world’s most successful people give 100% of their time to whatever it is they are doing.

They are hyper-focused and relentlessly present with what’s directly in front of them: at work, at the gym, with their family.

Most people prize “being busy.” They proclaim it with pride as if it’s a badge of honor.

But extremely successful people don’t tolerate busywork or distraction. Because most of the time "busyness" is nothing more than distraction and procrastination from what really matters.

You have all the time in the world if you know how to utilize the time you’re given.

There are no limits on time. You can complete as much work as you want — if you have the right mindset and environment

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While the desire for quality time comes from a good place, it is not part of reality. 

One side of us is influenced by movies and wants everything to be special. But that ideal is almost impossible to live up to and often results in disappointment.

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By the hour

This works well for the chronic procrastinator: those who say they will do it later and then wonder why it never gets done.

Instead of getting overwhelmed, tackle your to-do list in small manageable chunks. Scheduling your time by the hour takes little effort to implement but pro...

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Welcome help

We’re all aware that asking for help is important. But we’re also very likely to cast off what we’d consider unsolicited advice. 

Think of a child looking for a lost toy. You might not even know where it is, but you can scaffold their search: Have you tried looking under the couch?

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