Getting Outside The Box - Deepstash

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5 Steps to Thinking Outside of the Box

Getting Outside The Box

Getting Outside The Box
  1. Identify the issue.
  2. Determine if a typical solution to the problem exists.
  3. Map out everything that went into creating the issue.
  4. Look for ways to address the situation in the more outlying areas that were unconsidered.
  5. Don’t dismiss possible solutions because tradition stands against them. Go through every possibility until you know for a fact its feasibility.

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