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5 Steps to Thinking Outside of the Box

Getting Outside The Box

  1. Identify the issue.
  2. Determine if a typical solution to the problem exists.
  3. Map out everything that went into creating the issue.
  4. Look for ways to address the situation in the more outlying areas that were unconsidered.
  5. Don’t dismiss possible solutions because tradition stands against them. Go through every possibility until you know for a fact its feasibility.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

5 Steps to Thinking Outside of the Box

5 Steps to Thinking Outside of the Box

https://www.inc.com/matthew-swyers/5-steps-to-thinking-outside-of-the-box.html

inc.com

3

Key Ideas

Getting Outside The Box

  1. Identify the issue.
  2. Determine if a typical solution to the problem exists.
  3. Map out everything that went into creating the issue.
  4. Look for ways to address the situation in the more outlying areas that were unconsidered.
  5. Don’t dismiss possible solutions because tradition stands against them. Go through every possibility until you know for a fact its feasibility.

Finding Innovative Solutions

To find solutions you would otherwise ignore, train yourself to not just focus on the issue at hand but also to think more expansively about everything that led to that issue. 

Consider every possibility and hypothetical alteration of that reality, never being dismissive of anything before you have thoroughly thought it through. 

Thinking Outside The Box

Sometimes when you are losing in a game you have to stop playing by the rules, switch it up, and change the game itself. You have to think outside the box.

The key is to define the box in any given situation and then to seek alternatives, which are often unconventional solutions that would be considered beyond the norm.

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Mickey's look

In Plane Crazy, he does not have white gloves or oversized shoes. He didn't even have a consistent number of fingers.

  • Mickey's shoes, his trademark footwear, is introduced in the second cartoon, The Gallopin' Gaucho (1928), and stayed ever since.
  • His gloves made their first appearance as part of his stage costume in The Opry House (1929). His gloves became a permanent fixture in When the Cat's Away (1929), and has remained part of his design ever since.
  • His eyes first occupied his entire face but were redesigned as small, black ovals giving Mickey a greater range of facial expression.

Maturing character

The Band Concert (1935) was the first standard Micky Mouse cartoon in color with a signature red shorts. By this time, Mickey's mischievous prankster actions had passed on to Donald Duck. Mickey had transitioned into the role of an endearing romantic and humble hero.

Over time Mickey's facial features softened and appeared younger while his personality continued to mature. The Brave Little Tailor (1938) was the peak of Mickey's career, and at this point, Mickey became more curious and wholesome.

Today Mickey Mouse is optimistic, brave, and lovable in his iconic red shorts, yellow shoes, and white gloves.