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The Three Main Factors for Giving Good Advice

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It's important to be sincere when you hand out words of wisdom, as well as find a way to make things connect in the brain of your audience. Advice will go in one ear and out the other if your audience can't relate.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Three Main Factors for Giving Good Advice

The Three Main Factors for Giving Good Advice

https://lifehacker.com/the-three-main-factors-for-giving-good-advice-1643549972

lifehacker.com

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Key Ideas

Know your audience

Take note of your audience's preferred method of reasoning and decision making, then tailor your advice accordingly.

Use analogies

Avoid long, descriptive explanations and break things down with simple analogies. Use analogies based around common knowledge or things you know your audience would be knowledgeable about.

Obtain context

Investigate the problem and ask questions to get as much information as you can. You can't give good advice when you're missing pieces of the puzzle.

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The Advice Trap
The Advice Trap

It happens when one rushes to provide advice, which is most likely to be discarded or ignored, even if the person was asked for it.

Even with good intentions, providing advice isn’...

Word Play When Asking For Advice

When someone mentions a problem, it most likely isn’t the core problem but only an outward symptom.

Even if by some miracle one is able to find out the real problem, it does not mean that the advice doled out will be useful or will be implemented.

Ignorance And Superficial Knowledge

Most people are ignorant of their ignorance and live in a self-created bubble of superficial knowledge, which they believe is the only true knowledge there is, due to a cognitive bias known as the Dunning-Kruger effect.

A piece of straightforward advice doled out to be followed to the tee, is often due to lack of knowledge, rather than because of it.

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Tell a story

Dry information and stats don’t inspire people to make a change or listen to you.

We don't usually remember facts, figures or statistics. Storytelling is how you make your advice ...

Chunk it down

Chunk your advice down into simple steps that your audience can follow. 

Aim for three steps or three takeaways if it’s possible in the context of your advice.

Have a good structure

Be logical with your advice and structure it in a way that makes sense. Be sure to have an introduction, a body and a conclusion that highlights the takeaways.

This makes your advice easier to follow and more likely to be retained.

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Use The "Sandwich" Approach And Be Specific On The Expected Results

"Sandwiching" your critique between two positive things about the person's softens the blow, and avoids it coming off like an attack. The mix of positive and negative makes people more likel...

Give Feedback, Not Instruction

Keep your criticism to your observations, and the impact they have. Don't try to fix the problem, just identify it.

Offer to help fix the problem, and to support the solution that the other person comes up with. Unless you know how to do the work your coworker is doing, don't try to solve it for them—they'll ignore your feedback and you.

Give Kind Criticism, And Remember The Point Of It

The point of your criticism is to help someone improve, or to correct a problem, and your feedbacks should carry that message. If you’re doing anything but that, reevaluate whether you actually have legitimate criticism to give, or you just need to talk to someone.

Offer positive and specific suggestions to alleviate the issue at hand, or identify the problem clearly without talking about the person, just the issue.

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