The paradox of success - Deepstash

The paradox of success

There comes a time in every person's life when the methods and thinking that brought you success in the past won't continue to bring you success in the future. 

Your past successful strategies can bring you down. The key is to notice the signals and adapt before it's too late. 

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MORE IDEAS FROM Unlearn: Let Go of Past Success to Achieve Extraordinary Results

  • Organisations and the people in them must continuously be stimulated to succeed in the long run.
  • An organisation is transformed with a continuous individual transformation of both leaders and workers. 
  • As a leader, you are responsible for enabling organisational learning by reducing learning anxiety across your organisation.
  • Give people the opportunity to practice new behaviours deliberately.

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  • Identify a challenge your want to address. The best place to start is where you are now.
  • Define success as if you would view it from hindsight. What behaviours would you, your team, or customers be exhibiting to confirm that you have succeeded?
  • Seek courage over comfort. Moving out of your comfort zone requires courage and a willingness to be vulnerable.
  • Commit to, start, and scale the cycle of unlearning. Commit to moving through the Cycle of Unlearning continually.

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How to unlearn

Each time we need to adapt and innovate, we go through distinct steps.

  1. Unlearn: Unlearning starts with acknowledging that what you're doing now isn't working. You need to let go of past viewpoints or behaviours, then take action.
  2. Relearn: As you unlearn, you can take in new data and perspectives. You must be willing to be open to information that goes against your beliefs. You may need to learn how to learn again. You must create an environment for relearning.
  3. Breakthrough: It is the result of unlearning and relearning. 

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  • Leadership should provide context for what is to be achieved, why it matters, and then create a system of work that enables people to identify with those outcomes.
  • Leadership should provide clarity.
  • Control is reached by designing feedback loops, not by telling people what to do.

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Peter Senge's, The Fifth Discipline, points out the Laws of System Thinking:

  • Today's problems come from yesterday's "solutions".
  • The harder you push, the harder the system pushes back.
  • Behaviour grows better before it grows worse.
  • The easy way out usually leads back in.
  • The cure can be worse than the disease.
  • Faster is slower.
  • Cause and effect are not closely related in time and space.
  • Small changes can produce big results, but the areas of highest leverage are often the least obvious.
  • Dividing an elephant in half does not produce two small elephants.
  • There is no blame.

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  • Companies have two customers: the people you sell to and your employees.
  • Direct, raw, unfiltered feedback from customers is much better than reports from within the company.
  • When customers reach out, and they know they're heard and that their feedback will improve the product, they become more loyal. 

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  • Reflect
  • Feed forward learnings to the next experiment.
  • Align impact and increase psychological safety.
  • Increase your speed of unlearning.

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  • Create options for small steps: List as many options as possible. Pick one that will most likely move you forward. Then celebrate, regardless of the result.
  • Find the right behaviour that aligns with your level of motivation and ability.
  • Start even smaller than you think.

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RELATED IDEA

ELON MUSK

I think it’s possible for ordinary people to choose to be extraordinary.

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Mindsets drive what leaders do and why they do it. 

Two different leaders might face the same situation but respond to it very differently. One leader might see the case as threatening, whereas the other leader might see it as an opportunity.

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—STEVE JOBS

When you grow up, you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save money. That’s a very LIMITED LIFE. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact. THAT IS—EVERYTHING AROUND YOU THAT YOU CALL LIFE WAS MADE UP BY PEOPLE NO SMARTER THAN YOU. And you can change it. You can influence it. . . . Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.

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I've added all the essential exercises mentioned in the book in the stash below. These mindful exercises and certain questions which you can ask yourself are indeed a gem and definitely must be included in your existing mindfulness practice or journaling habit for a more enhanced overall development. A ONE-STOP SOLUTION INDEED!

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