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How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation

Albert Einstein
“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”

Albert Einstein

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How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation

How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation

https://www.fastcompany.com/1672354/how-reframing-a-problem-unlocks-innovation

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein

“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”

The frames we use to see the world

The frames we create for what we experience both inform and limit the way we think.  And most of the time we are not aware of the frames we are using.

Being able to question and shift your frame of reference is an important key to enhancing your imagination because it reveals completely different insights.

Reframing problems

It takes effort, attention, and practice to see the world around you in a brand-new light.

You can practice reframing by physically or mentally changing your point of view, by seeing the world from others’ perspectives, and by asking questions that begin with “why.” 

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When trying to get your point across...

... avoid negative language.

Using negative words will activate and strengthen your opponent's frames and undermine your own views.  Successfully arguing a point requires you to ...

Mental frames

... are structure that are represented in the brain by neural circuitry. Frames shape the way people see the world, and consequently, the goals they seek and the choices that they make.

Mental frames and decision making

They are extremely powerful, because most of our actions are based on the unconscious and metaphorical frames we already have in place. And once a frame is in place, the boundaries of that frame and the associations of that frame are all taken into account in our decision making.

Winning an Argument

The odds of winning an argument require more than just logic and rationality, as there are a lot of other factors involved.

By understanding and changing the 'frames' a person uses and center...

Understanding Frames

Frames, with respect to a discussion or argument, are different categories to 'slot' an idea or topic, just like a car can be evaluated by its color, price, or model number.

Change the Frame

During the course of an argument, to increase compliance towards your belief, you can change the framing of the existing belief of the listener.

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Not fitting in
Not fitting in

Some people credit their creative successes to being loners or rebels.

Research conducted discovered that rejection and creativity were related, but only when participants had an independ...

Circumstances that promote creativity
  • Creative types of people, such as artists and writers, are more likely to be considered "odd or peculiar" as children.
  • Being considered "weird" in your culture can also raise an element of creativity called integrative complexity. Outsiders are less concerned with what the in-crowd thinks, so have more leeway to experiment. They are freer to innovate and change social norms.
  • Unusual experiences may boost creativity. People often report having breakthroughs after extreme adventures that interferes with rules and expectations.
Dissenting viewpoints

Unusual viewpoints can boost the decision-making power of a broader group.

Experiments reveal that people are more willing to conform when they are in a group for fear of being seen as peculiar. However, when someone is willing to stand out, the dissenter appears to give the others permission to disagree.