Gamification - Deepstash
Gamification

Gamification

Gamification is the craft of deriving fun and engaging elements found typically in games and thoughtfully applying them to real-world or productive activities.

Gamification is the science/art of making a boring activity game-like: more intriguing, motivating ... and even “fun.”

4

STASHED IN:

17

I am a product designer fascinated by game design. Although I am not a gamer, I believe game design can transform boring activities into fun experiences (Will add more ideas as I stumble upon them).

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

MORE IDEAS FROM Actionable Gamification

Octalysis: The 8 Core Drives of Gamification
  1. Epic Meaning & Calling: believing we are doing something greater than ourselves
  2. Development & Accomplishment: make progress, develop skills, achieve mastery
  3. Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback: figuring new things out
  4. Ownership & Possession: feeling like we own/ control something
  5. Social Influence: mentorship, acceptance, feedback, companionship, competition & envy
  6. Scarcity & Impatience: wanting something simply because it is extremely rare
  7. Unpredictability: when we don’t know what is going to happen next
  8. Loss & Avoidance: avoiding something negative from happening

5

STASHED IN:

21

The Game of Work

In the book called "Game of Work", Charles Coonradt addressed the question “Why would people pay for the privilege of working harder at their chosen sport or recreational pursuit than they would work at a job where they were being paid?” He then boiled it down to 5 conclusions that led to hobbies being more preferable to work:

  1. Clearly defined goals
  2. Better scorekeeping and scorecards
  3. More frequent feedback
  4. A higher degree of personal choice of methods
  5. Consistent coaching

5

STASHED IN:

18

The Levels of the Octalysis Framework

Beyond the basic Level I analysis 👇

Level II: optimize experiences throughout all four phases of the player/user journey:

  1. Discovery (why people would even want to try out the experience),
  2. Onboarding (where users learn the rules and tools to play the game),
  3. Scaffolding (the regular journey of repeated actions towards a goal)
  4. Endgame (how do you retain your veterans)

Level III factors in different player types (like Achievers, Socializers, Explorers, and Killers or specific user cohort).

4

STASHED IN:

16

White Hat vs Black Hat Gamification

The top Core Drives in the octagon (of the Octalysis gamification framework) are considered very positive motivations (White Hat), while the bottom Core Drives are considered to be more negative (Black Hat).

If something is engaging because it lets you express your creativity, makes you feel successful through skill mastery, and gives you a higher sense of meaning, it makes you feel very good and powerful. But if you are always doing something because you don’t know what will happen next, you are constantly in fear of losing somethingthe experience will often leave a bad taste in your mouth.

3

STASHED IN:

16

YU-KAI CHOU

If I were my own role-playing game character, I would never just stay in town, be idle and do nothing. Of course not!

I would go out into the wilderness, defeat monsters, gain experience, learn new skills, accumulate resources, ally myself with those who have complementary skills, learn from those who were of a higher level than I, and seek to conquer exciting quests.

7

STASHED IN:

20

Left & Right Brain /  Core Drives

The core drives can be divided in half: 

  • Right Brain Core Drives: They focus on creativity, self-expression & social dynamics. They rely on Intrinsic Motivations – you don’t need a goal or reward to use your creativity, hangout with friends, or feel the suspense of unpredictability – the activity itself is rewarding on its own.
  • Left Brain Core Drives: They are associated with logic, analytical thought, and ownership. They tend to rely on Extrinsic Motivation – you are motivated because you want to obtain something, whether it be a goal, a good, or anything you cannot obtain.

3

STASHED IN:

16

YU-KAI CHOU

The truth is, simply incorporating game mechanics and game elements does not make a game fun.

1

STASHED IN:

15

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

First why, then how

Most people approach data the wrong way: They start with a data set, then use their favourite tools and techniques on it. This produces a narrow set of unsurprising results.

When we want to gain knowledge from the data, we should first do some thinking. Before we can answer how we first need to ask why. But this can be surprisingly challenging. The answer is to have a structure to think through all the aspects of a problem.

1

STASHED IN:

2

Thinking With Data is not about how to do data analysis but about first working out what the problem is that you're trying to solve.

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

The Product Leader

The job profile of a product leader is akin to a CEO of a company.

A product leader is ultimately responsible for the success and failure of a product, and by extension, the company itself. This raises the question of what makes a true product leader.

We find out the traits of a model product leader and the product team in this book.

3

STASHED IN:

17

Product Leaders and Product Teams: Management Basics

STASHED IN:

1 Comment

Jim Collins

"When you marry operating excellence with innovation, you multiply the value of your creativity."

42

STASHED IN:

130

STASHED IN:

0 Comments