Going through your weekly review

  • Be objective: Try your best to take an unbiased look at your week and lean on objective measures of your performance for the week.
  • Be efficient: Move from one checklist item to the next without lingering too long in any one area.
  • Be kind: Instead of beating yourself up about a bad week, gently reflect on what went wrong and plan for a more productive week ahead.

@jes_o420

Time Management

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The weekly review

It’s dedicated time to think about the past week, reflect on what went well and what didn’t, and plan for the week ahead. 

It’s a chance to get aligned with your goals and ensure that the work you’re doing on a daily basis is helping you reach them

  • Get Clear: process all your loose-ends.
  • Get Current: make sure all your items are up to date.
  • Get Creative: come up with new ideas to improve how you live and work.
  • You gain an objective view of the week: a weekly review forces you to practice intention by taking time to pause and reflect as you consider what you did versus what you planned to do.
  • You become proactive in planning: a weekly review isn’t only a retrospective, but a prospective too. It lets you run through the upcoming Monday to Friday proactively.
  • Choose your weekly review day, time, and place: Consistency will keep you on track when motivation won’t. Keep your weekly review at the same time on the same day every week.
  • Create your weekly review checklist: Have a checklist handy that details exactly what you’ll go through during your weekly review.

...  to ask yourself during your weekly review:

  • How do I feel I did this week overall?
  • What enabled me to reach my goals this week?
  • Has anything stopped me from reaching my goals this week?
  • How can I improve for next week?
  • What can I do next week that will set me up for my long-term goals?
David Allen
he Weekly Review is the critical success factor for marrying your larger commitments to your day-to-day activit

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RELATED IDEAS

Make time for a weekly review to consider whether your planning process is working or could be tweaked. Consider these questions:

  • Are my days calm and intentional or stressful and irregular?
  • Did I complete all my daily planning sessions or skip some?
  • Do I feel accomplished at the end of most days?
  • Are my high priority days being addressed?
  • Am I on track to meet my long-term goals?
  • This day was especially productive — why?
  • I accomplished nothing impactful on this day — why?

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IDEAS

Key Points

The key to this method is prioritizing your task list in advance — a dedicated weekly review is a must. Take stock of what’s coming up for the week ahead and make a rough sketch of your time blocks for each day. At the end of every workday, review any tasks you didn’t finish — as well as any new tasks that have come in — and adjust your time blocks for the rest of the week accordingly.

Must, Should, Want

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract, visual

Perfect for people who: Need to prioritize tasks, but tend to go for lists over graphs.

What it does: Prioritizes your tasks by urgency, ensures that you’re accomplishing the right things.


Write down everything you have to do and then identify each as a Must, a Should, or a Want.


Your Must tasks are non-negotiable. Pay rent” — that’s a Must if it’s the first of the month.


A Should is something you need to do, but it’s not dire that it be done today. Answering certain emails may be a Should.


A Want is something you’d like to do, but might not be practical or necessary at the moment.

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