Learning to be assertive

Learning to be assertive

Being assertive means learning to manage your energy, plan your approach and craft your message in a way that maximizes potential for the other person, to be open to receiving and accepting it.

@harzaa11

🗣

Communication

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

  1. Make it known you noticed that underhanded insinuation by pausing and directing your attention to it.
  2. Calmly state you will revisit what they said, the action they took or the decision they made at another point. And you don’t ask it as a question; you make a statement.

Give yourself space to come to terms with what you experienced before being able to consider what action to take next.

Get clear on your values. It’s important that you understand within yourself first, the nature and reason behind the battle you choose to fight.

Stepping into the other person’s perspective is not about dismissing your feelings or compromising your values and principles. 

It helps you to communicate in a language the other person will understand.

Being assertive Is about boundary setting, not winning.

Part of being assertive is stating your boundaries and illustrating very clearly (with examples) the line the other parties should not cross. 

  • Choose your timing wisely
  • Be prepared to have examples and stories, to give a stronger, clearer message
  • Avoid placing blame
  • Stick with the facts and describe the emotional and impact upon you with diplomacy.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

No one is interested in an elaborate saga. Instead, ask a short, clear question on a subject in which the other person has expertise. They'll often be glad to help.

Follow up on an agreed time. If they tell you they’ll be busy until the fall, then don’t send them another message on July 31st. Wait until autumn starts and then send a polite note.

4

IDEAS

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
“I developed a theory of optimal experience based on the concept of flow—the state in which people are so involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter; the experience itself is so enjoyable that people will do it even at great cost, for the sheer sake of doing it”

People who experience more positive emotions enjoy better relationships and are more resilient in response to negative events. 

Be intentional about doing things that bring you joy. Practice gratitude, engage in acts of kindness, exercise and reminisce about positive experiences.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap