The psychology of owning stuff - Deepstash

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Every Thing You Own is a Relationship You're In

The psychology of owning stuff

Our possessions are more psychological than physical. What a thing is is much less important than what it does to your mind when you own it.

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The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing
It explores how putting your space in order causes correspondingly dramatic changes in lifestyle and perspective.

Marie Kondo, the author, recommends that you start by discarding an...

The problem with storage

Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved.

Organizing all your junk better does not equal getting rid of clutter. And unfortunately most people leap at storage methods that promise quick and convenient ways to remove visible clutter.

Tidy by category, not by location

For example, set goals like “clothes today, books tomorrow.” 

We often store the same type of item in more than one place and when we tidy each place separately, we fail to see that we’re repeating the same work in many locations. 

Hans Hofmann

“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.”

Hans Hofmann
Remove decorations

... that no longer inspire you. Just because something made you happy in the past doesn’t mean you have to keep it forever.

Your life has moved on—maybe it’s time for the decoration to do the same. Keeping just the items that mean the most to you will help them to shine.

Reject the convenience fallacy

There are certain places in our homes we tend to leave items out for convenience. By leaving these things out, we think we’re saving time and simplifying our lives. That’s the convenience fallacy. 

W might save a couple of seconds, but the other 99.9 percent of the time, those items just sit there creating a visual distraction. 

Epictetus

“Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants.”

Epictetus
Rules for de-cluttering life
  • Don't buy the stuff you can't afford.
  • Live below your means
  • Get rid of things when they take up the space you need. Donate or recycle them.