Emotionally based decisions - Deepstash

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Decisions are largely emotional, not logical: the neuroscience behind decision-making

Emotionally based decisions

Have you ever brought a well-constructed argument, convinced that your logic will sway the other party? Except that the other party refused to budge. 

According to the latest finding in neuroscience, what we believe are logical decisions are based on emotion.

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Using emotional intelligence in negotiations
  • Repeat the last 1-3 words your counterpart just said back to them - makes your counterpart feel safe enough.
  • Practice tactical empathy. Demonstrate to your counterpart that you see the nuances of their emotions.
  • Get to a “no.” Being pushed for “yes” makes people defensive; they fear a trap. 
  • The moment you’ve convinced someone that you understand their dreams and feelings is the moment a negotiation breakthrough can happen.
  • Create the illusion of control. The secret to gaining the upper hand in a negotiation is to give the other side the illusion of control. 
Your Final Decision

While making your final decision, keep in mind that:

  • You are clear about your deadline for signing the job offer.
  • Assert your deadline continually.
  • Use your final decision as a Trump Card. 
Pre-committing a signing date gives space to the final negotiation process, providing weight to your words, and can help us ward off pressure to sign early to end the negotiations.
Companies Love Negotiating

Companies like you to submit early in the negotiation and be done with it, so it's best not to fall in their traps and pressure tactics.

Respectfully moving forward, showing transparency and maturity signals to the company that you are not just playing games, and are moving towards a final decision. Being honest, open and communicative is the key.

Negotiating is all about relationship, with communication being the bedrock.

Not Just About Money
  • There are various dimensions in a job to be motivated by, not just what you get paid. Your training period, kind of work, kind of team, and the other things you value, like work-life balance, for instance.
  • You also need to understand what the company values. Salary is a recurring cost, that increases over time while being a subject of gossip due to inequality. A joining bonus is a one-time expense and isn't public.
  • There are other perks to negotiate for, like relocation bonus, which can be easier to arrange.
Negotiation

... is a key life skill, an inherently interpersonal activity that requires a good understanding of human psyche, and it is vital to your success.

Negotiator perform 2 cognitive tasks:
  1. Judgement: Evaluate the content of the available options for its fairness.
  2. Choice: Determine which available option is preferred.
Use a Red Herring

Instead of making one single offer, try offering 3 possible scenarios:

  1.  Something that works for you but can be very expensive for the other party. A win-lose.
  2.  The red herring. Something that is a lose-lose for both parties. An option through which no one wins.
  3. Something that is a middle ground and a win-win for both.
Social psychology shows when you present  more options (the red herring), the other party will rarely decline all the options.