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4 Ways You're Making Your Job Harder Than It Is

Planning for Every Possible Scenario

Overanalyzing every possible scenario or roadblock means you’ll continue to postpone getting started on a project.

So commit to getting started. You can still make changes along the way. 

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4 Ways You're Making Your Job Harder Than It Is

4 Ways You're Making Your Job Harder Than It Is

https://www.themuse.com/advice/job-is-too-hard-how-to-fix-it

themuse.com

4

Key Ideas

Clinging to Outdated Processes

Sometimes it seems way easier to hang on to your standard way of doing things than to adjust to your company’s new process.

But your approach is probably slowing you down. New features are usually adopted because they're more efficient. So figure out what you need to do to familiarize yourself with that new process.

Seeking Everybody’s Approval

When starting a new task or assignment, figure out exactly who is the key decision-maker. That will give you the confidence you need to move forward—without hearing from absolutely everybody involved.

Forgetting Previous Feedback

Needing to change the same thing time and time again can be really frustrating.

So consider starting a feedback log for yourself, where you can reference changes that were suggested previously and ensure that you incorporate them into your future assignments.

Planning for Every Possible Scenario

Overanalyzing every possible scenario or roadblock means you’ll continue to postpone getting started on a project.

So commit to getting started. You can still make changes along the way. 

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The way we follow up on email

In follow up emails, the phrase “Per my last email,” can be avoided, as it can sound a bit rude.

The Direct Approach

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Restate the request

You can restate your original request, summarizing in one or two sentences.

If your original email was never read, this will be beneficial again.

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Task switching and focus

Taking on additional tasks simultaneously can destroy up to 80% of your productive time:

  • Focusing on one task at a time = 100% of your productive time available.
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A schedule for sustained attention
It includes:
  • Large chunks of focused “flow” time for more demanding projects.
  • “Themed” days to reduce the need to recalibrate between different tasks.
  • Advanced planning so you can prioritize meaningful work.
  • Realistic time set aside for admin, communication, and meetings.
  • Clear expectations for your teammates so they know when not to interrupt you.

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