deepstash

Beta

Storm To Perform: The 4 Stages Of Team Productivity

Group Development Theory

Dr. Bruce Tuckman, a psychology professor, synthesized team development into four basic stages: Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing.

84 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Storm To Perform: The 4 Stages Of Team Productivity

Storm To Perform: The 4 Stages Of Team Productivity

https://blog.trello.com/form-storm-norm-perform-stages-of-team-productivity

blog.trello.com

5

Key Ideas

Group Development Theory

Dr. Bruce Tuckman, a psychology professor, synthesized team development into four basic stages: Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing.

Forming

This stage of teamwork is all about first meetings and first impressions.

What everyone needs most is a clear understanding of their part in the journey and a setup for building emotional connections. Setting goals together puts their skills and interests into the open.

Storming

Most teams go through the storming stage in some form or another because discord is inevitable. The key value to emphasize in the team is positive intent. 

A little conflict is needed to bring upfront weak spots in projects and to bring new valid arguments to the table. But constant storming leads to the destruction of productivity, projects, and ultimately, the team itself.

Norming

Getting to the Norming stage takes a healthy dose of observation, identification, and action on things that are working (and not working).

Teams that stay in Norming are constantly working out things like communication preferences, recognition of achievements, and workflows.

Performing

This is the stage when the synergy comes in:

  • Group norms have been accepted, and people feel comfortable to exchange ideas, without fear of misplaced judgment or rejection.
  • Team members have a clear understanding of where they can best serve the team’s needs, and everyone is highly motivated to get to the same goal.
  • Team members are interdependent, meaning they need little managing.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Defining group norms
Defining group norms

Group norms are the set of informal and formal ground rules that specify how people interact. The rules help members of the group determine how to behave. Advantages of clear g...

Intentionally create group norms

Every team has rules, but few are intentionally crafted. This could have a negative impact. For example:

  • In a team of two, it's easy to create short back-and-forth emails. As more team members join, it becomes more complex keeping everyone in the loop. Emails may include reply-alls about weekend plans and real-time decision-making, leading to unread emails and lost information.
  • A single individual dictates the rules for the group. He may inadvertently communicate late at night that can affect an entire company.
How to create healthy group norms

Setting up norms is easiest when the team is first created. It may take a special meeting at the start, but it saves time and diminish problems down the road.

Shifting group norms in an established team is possible, too. Cultivate positive behavioral expectations on high-functioning teams.

6 more ideas

The first rule of team building

To lead a team effectively, you must first establish your leadership with each team member. 

Most effective team leaders build their relationships of trust and loyalty, rather tha...

Steps for building effective teams
  • Consider each employee's ideas as valuable.
  • Be clear when communicating. 
  • Encourage trust and cooperation among employees on your team. 
  • Encourage team members to share information, to listen and to brainstorm.
  • Let the team work on creative solutions together.
  • Set ground rules for the team. 
  • Establish the parameters of consensus-building sessions.
Psychological safety in team building
Team members need to feel comfortable speaking up to create the communication dynamics necessary for success.

It all comes down to trust, which is one of the characteristics teambuilding...

For an effective teambuilding:
  • Think outside the box when defining the format that works best for all team-members;
  • Avoid activities where people are singled out and might feel embarrassed. These create the opposite of the trust-building effect needed to build strong teams.
  • Effective teambuilding allows teams to tackle an achievable challenge together. Working through a challenge together increases oxytocin and group cohesiveness.