How misinformation builds - Deepstash

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How misinformation builds

How misinformation builds

  • When we encounter unfamiliar information on a social network, we verify it in one of two ways. We either go through the burdensome process of countless claims and counter-claims to understand if it is true, or we rely on others by way of social proof.
  • If we search for online information, instead of coming up with our own way of assessing the quality or the usefulness of every website,  we rely on Google's PageRank algorithm to come up with the best sites. In essence, we rely on other people to source information by use of user traffic, reviews, ratings, clicks and likes.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

Infostorms are like actual storms: they are a product of climatic conditions. Different climates can produce different results.

The more we understand the chain of events that led to a particular view, the better we are equipped to appreciate it if we are skeptical or take into account othe...

We often feel overwhelmed when we are exposed to a large volume of information. We also rely on secondary knowledge that does not come from any external source.

To put it another way: rightly or wrongly, we think what other people think. The digital culture has taken this relianc...

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Paradox of knowledge

The increased access to information and knowledge we have today does not empower us or make us more cognitively autonomous.

Instead, it makes us more dependent on other people's judgments and evaluations of the information that we are faced with.

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Everyone can learn to brainstorm better - it’s a process like any other. 

And the beauty of a process is that it can be taught, learned, and shared. 

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Limit the time spent reading news

“Headline anxiety” is a growing problem. 

One way to reduce the impact of the non-stop news cycle is to use screen-time trackers, available for most smartphones, to limit the time you spend reading or watching the news on your mobile.

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