Less Sleep is dangerous - Deepstash

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If you're just not a morning person, science says you may never be

Less Sleep is dangerous

Less Sleep is dangerous

It has been associated with higher blood pressure, body mass index, and increased calcification of the coronary artery.

  • In lab experiments, people who slept only five hours a night for one week became less sensitive to insulin, which makes it harder to maintain blood sugar levels.
  • In an overnight sleep study of 1,024 individuals, poor sleep was associated with the misregulation of the hunger hormones leptin and ghrelin.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Waking Up Late Means Moving Less
Waking Up Late Means Moving Less

Rising early in the day makes an overall difference in the number of steps one walks during the entire day, with the late risers moving around less.

  • Each of us has a master internal body clock in our brains, along with many smaller cellular clocks that track and absorb outside information.
  • The master clock then makes the necessary body changes, like releasing hormones and chemicals that affect our alertness, hunger and sleep.
Our Chronotype

Our various biochemical signals, daily lifestyle, and genetic inclinations develop a specific chronotype in us, that is basically our overall biological response to the outside world.

These chronotypes are categorized as: Morning, Day or Night. The person with a morning chronotype will wake up early in the morning and start to feel hungry sooner than the person with a Day or Night chronotype.

The Body Rhythm

The chronotypes we form are not permanent in most cases but have a rhythm of their own, spawning years, and shifting from Morning to Day and eventually, Night, based on our age.

People with chronotypes that are more towards the evening are more prone to various metabolic disorders and are likely to develop obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Jet lag

Jet Lag is a debility similar to a hangover. Jet Lag derives from the simple fact that jets travel so fast they leave your body rhythms behind.

Our biological clocks are synchronized to a 24-hour period. Our internal clocks drive our circadian rhythms, which anticipate dawn and dusk, and control everything from blood pressure to how hungry we are. When we fly to a different time zone, (or work night shifts), our internal clocks go out of sync.

We take a few days to adjust

Our bodies take a few days to fully adjust, depending on not only how many time zones have been crossed, but also the direction of travel.

Usually, it would take five or six days to adjust to a six-hour shift in time zone. When you travel east, your body has a shorter time to synchronize with the regular 24-hour sun cycle. When you travel west, your body has extra time to adjust.

Speeding up the adjustment

Generally, the best way to fool your biological clock is to shift your internal rhythms before the flight.

  • Restrict light exposure to specific times.
  • Restrict rest and meals.
  • Adjust activities such as walking and running to specific times.
  • Use melatonin - the hormone that makes us sleepy - in small amounts. However, certain people should avoid melatonin.
Social jet lag
A term describing the difference between people’s sleep schedules on workdays and free days. It highlights the difference between how they’d like to structure their days and how they have to structure their days in order not to lose their jobs and friends.
4 Types of Sleeper based on Chronotype
  • Bear:  good sleepers with internal body clock that tracks the rise & fall of the sun. 50% of the population. 
  • Wolf: people who prefer to stay up late. 15-20% of the population.
  • Lion:  classic morning people. You read about them in all the productivity articles. 15-20% of the population.
  • Dolphin: light sleepers, who frequently get diagnosed with insomnia. 10% of the population.