Handling friendly teasing - Deepstash

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How To Turn Awkwardness Into Confidence

Handling friendly teasing

  • Take up more space: this signals that you are not afraid to take control on a physical level and it shows increased confidence.
  • Laugh with the group: if you laugh with it, it goes away in most cases.
  • Double down on the joke: amplifying the joke puts you in control of the situation, shows your human side and spreads the laughter.

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