David Hume: Both Sides of the Coin - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

David Hume: Why You're Probably Wrong About Everything You Know

David Hume: Both Sides of the Coin

The philosophy of the Scottish philosopher David Hume wasn't just about being disagreeable. He was skeptical and doubtful on authority, and on himself too.

He could highlight flaws on both sides of the argument, his side and the opponent's side. His balanced and practical intellect made him a rare historical figure.

188 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Spirituality
Spirituality

The term spirituality has one of two connotations: One is a classic religious one; the other is inspired by New Age Culture. Both categories embody spirituality better than cold, hard reason.

In a broad sense, both categories seem to move away from a world of science and reason.

Reason is more of a guide

In a world where we can have complete information about everything, reason can give us certain answers. However, the world we are living in is not even close to having all the answers. In this world, words are fallible. So is perception and imagination.

Reason is then more of a guide than a symbol of truth.

The limits of understanding

There are limitations to what the human mind can understand. The mysteries of the Universe and our conscious experience are too complex to be restricted to words and formulas. 

We mostly operate on faith and habit in ways that aren’t obvious. 

Reason Is Subject To Passion
Reason Is Subject To Passion

Humans, by nature, are rationally weak but passionately motivated. Emotions are always stronger and drive action, and reasoning is often used as an excuse for inaction.

Neuroscience is now revisiting emotions as drivers of action, reducing them to mere tools. The complexity of emotions, especially the mixed variety, runs deeper than just being catalysts for action.

Automatic Actions To Responses

Our emotions often trigger automatic actions which we tend to regret later. The suffering that we and others then undergo can be termed as compassion. The challenge is to distance ourselves from our automatic emotions that trigger reflex actions, or reactions.

True, responsive action has to be cultivated by being aware of our actions, habits and emotions. By checking our habits, and ensuring that whatever we do has value in it, we can get rid of our reactions, based on emotions.