Sadder and Sadder

Sadder and Sadder

There is a huge industry built on Happiness, ranging from Self-help Gurus to Yoga.

All data points south even after all this as people are getting sadder, not happier.

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Health

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Depression as Chronic Sadness

Depression and mental illness are long associated with being sad and mentally ill people and those fighting mental disorders are judged by the misleading emotional states like happiness, which have nothing to do with the underlying disorder.

Using Therapy

Many people believe therapy is something you need when you are not satisfied, happy or content with life.

Mental illnesses go far beyond being happy or sad, and many people that don't think they need therapy may, in fact, be in acute need of it.

Happy Pills
  • It’s a myth that mental health and happiness mean the same thing.
  • Happiness is just another emotional state, like sadness.
  • Depression is portrayed as not being happy, which is untrue.
  • The pill-popping generations label anti-depressant pills as Happy Pills, which is also misleading.

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RELATED IDEAS

Deciding to see a therapist

You don’t need to have a specific diagnosis to benefit from therapy.

Most of us have some aspects of our lives we would like to improve: relationships that are in need of some rehab or some habits or behaviors that we would like to shift or change.

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IDEAS

Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

BDD is a mental disorder where a person is preoccupied with an imagined or minor physical defect that others often cannot see.

As a result, people with BDD see themselves as "ugly" and often avoid social exposure. The preoccupation with the defect often leads to ritualistic behaviours, such as always looking in a mirror or picking at the skin. The person with BDD eventually becomes overly obsessed with the defect so that their social, work, and home functioning suffers.

  • One example of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is the phobia related to germs and leads to a person disinfecting and cleaning everything obsessively.
  • It is already problematic for many and is now amplified due to the ongoing pandemic.
  • A person who is fanatic about sanitizing is having OCD if it is accompanied by constant anxiety and distress.
  • One in every 100 adults suffer from this disorder in the U.S., and it may be genetic.

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