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The 5 Types of Work That Fill Your Day

Reactionary Work

Reactionary work is the stuff that we do out of a reaction, like picking a phone because it is ringingChecking email, replying to a text message, is all reactionary work. It is a necessary evil.

Reactionary work can be distracting and take up most of our time. Blocking time for certain activities like responding to email or replying to text messages may help.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The 5 Types of Work That Fill Your Day

The 5 Types of Work That Fill Your Day

https://99u.adobe.com/articles/7151/the-5-types-of-work-that-fill-your-day

99u.adobe.com

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Key Ideas

Reactionary Work

Reactionary work is the stuff that we do out of a reaction, like picking a phone because it is ringingChecking email, replying to a text message, is all reactionary work. It is a necessary evil.

Reactionary work can be distracting and take up most of our time. Blocking time for certain activities like responding to email or replying to text messages may help.

Planning Work

Planning work is time spent on listing, prioritizing and scheduling your work. 

Planning helps us become efficient in our execution. Thus, allocating special time for planning work is crucial. Proactive planning can be exceptionally productive and beneficial in the long run.

Procedural Work

It is the stuff we have to do, like writing a check to pay our bills, preparing our tax returns, or even making a daily report.

Procedural work is best tackled by technology: automation minimizes the time spent and errors generated in any procedural work.

Insecurity Work

Insecurity work is our dip-checks, drills and monitoring the health of our business, making sure everything is normal.

Insecurity work can be compartmentalized into chosen time periods every day, maybe just 30 minutes at the end of each day.

Problem-Solving Work

Our creativity is in its full potential in problem-solving work. This requires our brainpower, focus, and attention.

Fully Engaged Work

Problem-solving work is only possible in a distraction-free zone, away from the ringing phones and notifications.

If the problem you're working on is of genuine interest, then there is real engagement and exceptional results will follow.

Handling Reactionary Work

Reactionary work can be distracting and take up most of our time. Blocking time for certain activities like responding to email or replying to text messages may help.

Remember that reactionary work seems urgent but is not important at that moment.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

David Collis - Harvard Business School professor

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David Collis - Harvard Business School professor
Invite Dissent To Build Others’ Commitment

An executive needs those she leads to translate strategic insights into choices that drive results. For people to commit to carrying out an executive’s strategic thinking, they have to both understand and believe in it. But repeated explanations don’t necessarily increase people’s understanding and ownership of strategy. Making them discuss the pros and cons of it make it so the problem is better understood and flaws are identified and fixed increasing ownership for success.

Identify The Strategic Requirements Of The Job

When someone is promoted into a function that requires strategic leadership it’s easy to spend time fixing what was wrong in their previous function but that often isn’t what the strategic leadership position requires. So, identify the strategic requirements of your job and focus on them.

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Adopt GTD Methodology in Email

think of every email you get as either something you need to take action on, track, or refer to later. 

Every time you open a conversation, decide right away what to do with it. D...

Create an Email Productivity System

There’s no “definitive” system. The best framework is the one that works for you. Ideally, it should model your work style, supporting the way you work. Bonus points if it’s low-maintenance, fast to set up, and adaptable as your work changes.

Some people like to use folders with specific actions (do, delegate, reply), while others prefer the deadline-driven approach (today, tomorrow, next week).

Power Up Your Email with Plugins

Some examples:

  • Undo Send: for when you accidentally press the send button.
  • Canned Responses: create a template that you can reuse with canned responses.
  • Send and Archive: Automatically archive an email after replying to it using the send and archive button.

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Negotiable job requirements

Apart from jobs in academic professions, like medicine or law, job requirements are largely negotiable — you just have to prove that you can bring value to the table.

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Impostor syndrome as a good thing

Embrace that feeling of inadequacy.

The combination of believing that you can get to almost wherever you want to be, having discipline, and having insecurity about where you are is the formula for a successful, impactful career.

What’s “realistic” for you
... is entirely predicated on what you’ve been exposed to. There are so many things in life you take for granted that someone else would think is crazy and unrealistic.

Work alongside the best in your field, read their books, listen to their interviews, study what they did to get where they are — and eventually, those crazy unrealistic dreams will become realistic for you.

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Our estimates on how long certain tasks will take are almost always ...

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
“What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important."
The 4 Kinds of Priorities

The Decision Matrix on how to approach tasks has 4 quadrants:

  • Quadrant 1: The Urgent Problems which are important.
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  • Quadrant 3: Urgent but not really important
  • Quadrant  4: Distractions and time-wasting tasks. 

Prioritize the important (Quadrant 2) to attain maximum benefit from your work.

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The era of problem-solving generalists
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The pursuit of mastery

Mastery, once a sought-after attribute, is falling out of favour, according to the 2016 World Economic Forum report, and is slowly clearing the field for employees who can:

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  • Can take on a variety of roles at a short notice.
Expertise decline consequences

With the value of true expertise in serious decline, and the economy evolving towards a different set of requirements from employees, the impact on college education, career paths, worker safety, employability and even the nature of work is going to be profound.

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Scheduling styles
When it comes to our daily schedule, most people fall into one of two camps:
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Scheduling your day

A good daily schedule is a blueprint for a successful life. 

Knowing what we’re doing and when empowers us with a sense of purpose, meaning, and focus.

Your most important work

The most successful people consistently get their most important work done first.

Build recurring time for your most important work in the morning, before you start anything else. Your energy levels are naturally higher in the morning, but completing a meaningful task first thing has also a domino effect that pushes you through the day.

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Single Task

Switching between tasks can have damaging costs to our work and productivity.

Develop the habit of single-tasking by forcing your brain to concentrate on one task and one task only. Put your phone away, close all the browser windows and apps that you don’t need. Immerse yourself in this task. Only move to the next one when you’re done.

Brian Tracy
Brian Tracy

Time management is not a peripheral activity or skill. It is the core skill upon which everything else in life depends.” 

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