Reducing Emails And Distractions - Deepstash

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Use this easy 7-step plan to give you more time each day

Reducing Emails And Distractions

  • Sending and replying to email feels like work, but in reality, it is pseudo-work. Do not be available on email and chat all the time, setting aside time-blocks in a day.
  • To get into the ‘flow’ mode, you have to prioritize focus, blocking all outside distractions, by silencing your phone, and disabling those annoying notifications from apps that were never meant to send you any in the first place.

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The 30-Day Rule
The 30-Day Rule

One can develop healthy spending habits and avoid wasting money by using the simple 30-day rule: Whenever there is an urge to spend on something, just wait for 30 days.

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The Emotional Component of A Purchase
  • Marketers capitalize on the emotional component of any purchase while working hard towards ensuring consumers make ‘impulse’ purchases both online and offline.
  • Many people purchase due to their need for emotional fulfilment, indulging in shopping therapy and incurring credit card debt.
  • This leads to random, unused stuff lying in the house, which is not really needed.
When Everything Is On Sale

Most stores use the ‘SALE’ marketing gimmick (both online and offline) so that we can splurge our money now, instead of waiting.

The system is gamed for us to spend our money wherever we go. We need to stop wondering where our money went and start telling it where to go.

Have one daily priority

Many of us start our mornings with dozens of things we need to get done, but later realize that we haven't crossed any of them off our lists. We did get stuff done, but none of the things we pl...

Make planning a habit

Some mornings we feel motivated to create a to-do list, but that is often the exception. We need to get things done, even when we feel disengaged.

Start by setting the alarm for your daily planning session at the same time every day. Tack your new daily planning session onto an existing habit like drinking your morning coffee.

Align your to-do list with goals
  1. Break down your big goals into daily tasks. You can't add "Get in shape" to your daily to-do list, but you can add "spend 30 minutes on my bike."
  2. Consider your week as a whole. You likely have multiple goals. Some goals benefit from daily activity, while working towards others a few times a week can create momentum.
  3. Add your have-to-do tasks last. We often fill our to-do lists with have-to-do tasks that crowd the whole day. Adding it last forces you to fit your have-to-do tasks around your goal tasks.
The Wild Procrastinator

You are indecisive and often deals with things in the nick of time. But procrastination has a physical and social toll as your body and your coworkers get stressed over it.

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The Perfectionist

You are obsessed with your idea of perfection and end up spending way too much time on a specific task. This leads to feelings of being overwhelmed, missed deadlines and delaying other priorities.

Solution: Make sure you have achievable standards that don’t get in the way. Train yourself to do things that fall short of your idea of perfection until you begin to accept that the “imperfect” but functional is enough for most things.

The Underestimator

You often miscalculate how long it will take to do something to the point of missing deadlines and having to reschedule.

Solution: Schedule more time than you expect to take to finish a task, learn how to work faster and to estimate time more accurately. Reviewing past assignments duration will give you good time estimates for future reference.