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This book about how to get rich sold more than 32 million copies-here are 5 essential lessons you need to know

Rich Dad, Poor Dad

Rich Dad, Poor Dad

"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" is a best-selling personal finance book, written by Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter.

It reads like an allegorical story about Robert Kiyosaki and his two dads : a “poor dad”, a highly educated college professor & the “rich dad”, a wealthy entrepreneur who owns dozens of businesses. Both dads offer conflicting advice on money.

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Robert Kiyosaki

“A person can be highly educated, professionally successful, and financially illiterate.”

Robert Kiyosaki
Financial Literacy Questions

A financially literate person should be able to answer these questions:

  • How much are they earning after tax and after saving for retirement? Is it fair considering their education level and job title?
  • Are they earning above sector median rates, below, or on par?
  • How much goes to their retirement accounts?
  • How much goes into their investments?
  • What are the rates of return on their investments when benchmarked against an index like the S&P 500?
  • What are their financial plans?
  • Can they read a company's financial statement?
  • Do they understand their tax benefits?
  • Do they understand their retirement requirements?
  • Do they have a plan for retiring?
"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" is Fiction

John T. Reed, a real estate investor, looked into the accuracy of Kiyosaki's best-selling book and found it inaccurate:

  • The Rich Dad is most likely an invention. ...
"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" contains dangerous advice

According to John T. Reed the famous book is filled with bad advice:

Dangerous advice

  • "If you're gonna go broke, go broke big"
  • Convinces people that college is for suckers

Law-breaking advice

  • Advocates committing a felony: have rich friends for trading stock based on non-public inside information, he says "That's what friends are for."
  • Recommends tax fraud by deducting vacations and health club dues
  • Brags about using a partner weasel clause in which his cat is his partner
Kiyosaki is making money from a personality cult

Many critics pointed out that Kiyosaki is selling a cult, not financial advice.

He is accused of tapping into the fantasies of the masses & being short on specifics, both attributes of religious cults.