Rich Dad, Poor Dad

"Rich Dad, Poor Dad" is a best-selling personal finance book, written by Robert T. Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter.

It reads like an allegorical story about Robert Kiyosaki and his two dads : a “poor dad”, a highly educated college professor & the “rich dad”, a wealthy entrepreneur who owns dozens of businesses. Both dads offer conflicting advice on money.

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Money

This book about how to get rich sold more than 32 million copies-here are 5 essential lessons you need to know

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“Poor dad” vs "Rich Dad" Mentality

The “Poor dad”, a stereotype for the regular salary man, believes that one should work for money as an employee at a stable job. This mentality can trap a person into working a job they don’t love, but is willing to stick with because they have to pay the bills.

The "Rich dad", an entrepreneur, thinks wealth comes from experience-based learning (learn on the job, by becoming an entrepreneur) and multiple income streams.

When the “poor dad” encourages working your way up the ladder, “rich dad” laughs and says, “Why not own the ladder?”

According to Kiyosaki in his book "Poor Dad, Rich Dad", rich people do certain things poor people don't:

  1. The rich buy assets (things that generate revenue like bonds), not liabilities (things that cost money like rent).
  2. The rich become financial literate through experience, not by studying hard at fancy schools.
  3. The rich learn to sell early on.
  4. The rich manage fear better. They take more risks and don't play it safe.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES

A financially literate person should be able to answer these questions:

  • How much are they earning after tax and after saving for retirement? Is it fair considering their education level and job title?
  • Are they earning above sector median rates, below, or on par?
  • How much goes to their retirement accounts?
  • How much goes into their investments?
  • What are the rates of return on their investments when benchmarked against an index like the S&P 500?
  • What are their financial plans?
  • Can they read a company's financial statement?
  • Do they understand their tax benefits?
  • Do they understand their retirement requirements?
  • Do they have a plan for retiring?

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IDEAS

According to John T. Reed the famous book is filled with bad advice:

Dangerous advice

  • "If you're gonna go broke, go broke big"
  • Convinces people that college is for suckers

Law-breaking advice

  • Advocates committing a felony: have rich friends for trading stock based on non-public inside information, he says "That's what friends are for."
  • Recommends tax fraud by deducting vacations and health club dues
  • Brags about using a partner weasel clause in which his cat is his partner
Active vs Passive Income

There are 2 types of income:

Active Income: You are trading time for money. In order to make money you must perform something. Every day you start from zero.

Passive Income: You do not have to be present to generate income. Things like real estate, stocks, bonds are sources of passive income. You are literally making money while sleeping.

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