Unknown Dangers - Deepstash

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City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

Unknown Dangers

The one terrifying aspect of how the space we live affects our health is that many of the bad effects aren't even fully known to us, like mood swings, neuron damage, chemical imbalance and many brain-altering effects, that are yet to be fully studied.

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Rising Noise Around Us
  • Cities have a noise pollution problem, which is largely unaddressed.
  • Noise complaints regarding the high decibel levels of traffic, airplanes, and even helicopters are getting more fre...
Effect Of Noise on Children
  • According to the United Nations, about two-thirds of the world's population will be living in cities by the next 30 years.
  • The World Health Organization recommends classrooms to be not louder than 35 decibels, which is never the case in big cities.
  • Children are facing disruption in their learning, and research points out that those who study in a noisy place are 11 months behind the ones who are studying in quieter places in the same vicinity.
Living In Noise

Most of the city planning is done so that the affluent neighborhoods are in quieter areas.

However, this is also nullified when the ultra-rich who travel frequently stay close to the transit hubs (like Airports), being exposed to high decibels of noise.

The changing nature of childhood
The changing nature of childhood

The most valued childhood experiences of people who grew up in the 1970s and 1980s are things that the current generation of kids are far less likely to know.

What stands out is that

Less independence and autonomy

American children have less independence and autonomy today.

  • Parents have become more concerned with safety.
  • Parents run the risk of being charged with neglect for letting children walk unsupervised.
  • Some parents usher their children from one structured activity to the next, leaving little time to play, experiment, and make mistakes.

Kids who have autonomy and independence are less likely to be anxious. They are more likely to grow into self-sufficient adults.

Time with family

A childhood privilege was spending regular time with parents and access to meaningful interactions with other family members, especially grandparents.

Close grandparent-child relationships have significant mental health benefits for both children and grandparents.