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City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

Unknown Dangers

The one terrifying aspect of how the space we live affects our health is that many of the bad effects aren't even fully known to us, like mood swings, neuron damage, chemical imbalance and many brain-altering effects, that are yet to be fully studied.

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City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

https://www.popsci.com/physical-surroundings-cities-mental-illness/

popsci.com

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Key Ideas

City Life and Mental Health

New studies show that our physical surroundings affect our mental health as well, in a greater degree than previously known. The people living in big cities face a nearly 40 percent higher risk of depression, a 20 percent higher chance of anxiety, and double the risk of schizophrenia than people living in rural areas.

Part of this situation is due to social problems like loneliness and stress, complicated further by living within breathing distance of others.

Bad Air Around Us

Air pollution is causing various respiratory and cardiovascular problems among the population, killing millions every year.
Lack of breathable air is also an enabler of depression, anxiety and certain psychotic experiences.

Unknown Dangers

The one terrifying aspect of how the space we live affects our health is that many of the bad effects aren't even fully known to us, like mood swings, neuron damage, chemical imbalance and many brain-altering effects, that are yet to be fully studied.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Rising Noise Around Us

  • Cities have a noise pollution problem, which is largely unaddressed.
  • Noise complaints regarding the high decibel levels of traffic, airplanes, and even helicopters are getting more fre...

Effect Of Noise on Children

  • According to the United Nations, about two-thirds of the world's population will be living in cities by the next 30 years.
  • The World Health Organization recommends classrooms to be not louder than 35 decibels, which is never the case in big cities.
  • Children are facing disruption in their learning, and research points out that those who study in a noisy place are 11 months behind the ones who are studying in quieter places in the same vicinity.

Living In Noise

Most of the city planning is done so that the affluent neighborhoods are in quieter areas.

However, this is also nullified when the ultra-rich who travel frequently stay close to the transit hubs (like Airports), being exposed to high decibels of noise.

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Try to keep a routine

Doing so during stressful of traumatic periods of time will boost your resilience.
A routine could mean: eating meals at the same hours, sleeping, setting regular times to exercise, etc.

Exercise routines

This is an excellent way to stay healthy and occupy your time while being indoors.
Anything that gets your heart pumping or builds muscle is excellent for both physical and mental health.

Going outside

This is much easier in the country or suburbs. But remember to stay six feet away from other people.
Spending time in nature is a boon to both mental and physical health.

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Forced innovations

Throughout history, disease outbreaks have forced new innovations in urban design. Cholera epidemics in the 1800s led to the necessity for new plumbing and sewer systems as well as new zoning la...

Virus-free transit

Better design could help reduce crowds where viruses can easily spread.
At airports, security screening could be done differently so passengers are not forced to wait in crowded lines. It can reduce congestion and person-to-person contact.

Buildings

Air quality should happen in the public transportation system as well as inside buildings since we spend most of our time indoors.

  • Air can be made much cleaner with UV-C light, for example, that can eliminate viruses in air treatment systems.
  • Bringing fresh air into the buildings is important, as is improving ventilation outside in dense neighborhoods.
  • Future technology may include sensors that can detect viruses on surfaces in real-time that could trigger air cleaning.
  • Some buildings could also deploy temperature screening to identify people who might be ill.

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