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Bad Dreams Are Good

Bad Dreams May Be Good

Dreams are a common experience throughout the world, with human beings, animals and even birds being able to dream in their sleep.


According to a cluster of studies over the ages, a few theories about dreams:

  • Dreams reveal hidden truths and desires.
  • They help us process intense emotions.
  • They help in sorting through and consolidating memories.
  • Dreams help make sense of random neuron activity.
  • Dreams help in rehearsing a response to a challenging situation.
  • Dreams assist us to dramatize our personal concerns.

Many cultures and traditions interpret dreams in different ways, and bad dreams, it turns out, may not be that bad.


Negative dreams can forewarn us and make us handle things in a better way, if and when the situation arises in real life.

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Bad Dreams Are Good

Bad Dreams Are Good

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/04/dreams-what-do-they-mean/583216/

theatlantic.com

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