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Google's director of talent explains how to write a killer résumé

Critical language and keywords

Consider the job description as a guide for pointing out specific applicable attributes. These keywords are what recruiters look for on resumes to fill specific roles.

Use bullet points to help recruiters stay engaged.

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Google's director of talent explains how to write a killer résumé

Google's director of talent explains how to write a killer résumé

https://www.fastcompany.com/90458024/googles-director-of-talent-explains-how-to-write-a-killer-resume

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Your experience

Your resume should not just be about where you worked or went to school. It should convey the experience you gained and the lessons you learned.

  • A recent grad can include academic research, tutoring experience, and recent class projects.
  • Showcase professional accomplishments
  • Highlight the intersections of work and life.
  • Add if you volunteer or have a side hustle to present you as a holistic candidate.

Your results and impact

Data in a resume should be connected to the impact you've made.

  • If you're applying for a business role, convey your experience by sharing what you accomplished, how it was measured, and how it was done.
  • It can also apply to relevant leadership positions, university honors, or other types of recognition. However, be sure to do it with humility.

Critical language and keywords

Consider the job description as a guide for pointing out specific applicable attributes. These keywords are what recruiters look for on resumes to fill specific roles.

Use bullet points to help recruiters stay engaged.

What you can add to an organization

  • Consider adding a short summary section at the top of your resume.
  • Focus on what you can add to the organization.
  • Instead of using a list of recent job roles, consider providing qualitative and quantitative examples of previous experience.
  • Get in the habit of updating your resume every January.

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Closing A Hiring Pitch

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