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Don't have 10,000 hours to learn something new? That's fine - all you need is 20 hours

Learning a new skill

Learning a new skill

Wanting to learn something new comes from the curious part of us. But then we have to put in the work. Many feel discouraged during this early learning period which may lead to soon giving up.

However, it is possible to learn anything in just 20 hours - by putting in only 45 minutes a day for about a month.

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Don't have 10,000 hours to learn something new? That's fine - all you need is 20 hours

Don't have 10,000 hours to learn something new? That's fine - all you need is 20 hours

https://ideas.ted.com/dont-have-10000-hours-to-learn-something-new-thats-fine-all-you-need-is-20-hours/

ideas.ted.com

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Key Ideas

Learning a new skill

Wanting to learn something new comes from the curious part of us. But then we have to put in the work. Many feel discouraged during this early learning period which may lead to soon giving up.

However, it is possible to learn anything in just 20 hours - by putting in only 45 minutes a day for about a month.

Break the skill down

Decide what you want to learn, then break it down into smaller, manageable pieces. Identify the tools and skills behind each step.

For example, if you want to bake your own bread, the pieces would be making dough, letting it rise, kneading it, shaping it and putting it into a pan, and then baking it in the oven.

Learn enough

Get three to five resources about what you're trying to learn, be it a book or a YouTube video. Set a limit on the number of resources to prevent you from procrastinating.
Then jump in and do it.

Remove all distraction to practice

It may require you to remove all your electronic devices while you start your learning.

However, you could also combine your favorite distraction with your new activity. (For instance, turning on your favorite podcast while you bake.)

The frustration barrier

Commit to practice for at least 20 hours to overcome that period in the beginning when you feel incompetent and stupid.

When you reach 20 hours, you will be surprised at how good you are.

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