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I Used to Be Hungry All the Time - Tiny Buddha

Our Thoughts Make Us Weak

False subconscious beliefs include a feeling of nobody caring about what you have to say, a feeling of worthlessness and imagining yourself to be a miserable failure.

The astounding part is that we live most of our lives carrying these chronic false beliefs in us, manifesting them into unconscious actions leading to eating disorders.

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I Used to Be Hungry All the Time - Tiny Buddha

I Used to Be Hungry All the Time - Tiny Buddha

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/i-used-to-be-hungry-all-the-time/

tinybuddha.com

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Key Ideas

Our Subconscious Beliefs

  • Our beliefs, the stories we keep telling ourselves daily, along with our constant thoughts and emotions drive a lot of choices we make.
  • These unconscious beliefs and thought patterns shape our reality.
  • Our past experiences and childhood traumas play a big role in the formation of our beliefs, making us self-sabotage our confidence. It can also provide us with a nagging feeling of being unsafe and careless.

Our Thoughts Make Us Weak

False subconscious beliefs include a feeling of nobody caring about what you have to say, a feeling of worthlessness and imagining yourself to be a miserable failure.

The astounding part is that we live most of our lives carrying these chronic false beliefs in us, manifesting them into unconscious actions leading to eating disorders.

Curing The Negative Self-Image

The cure to a negative self-image formed by your beliefs is to be aware of what you think, speak or do. If you start to recognize your behavioural patterns, your hunger cravings and just pause before a habitual activity is starting, you can get a grip on the underlying emotions that drive these beliefs and corresponding actions.

Awareness and body-connection become your starting point, and one can then learn to recognize, manage, accept, and allow emotions, with eyes wide open.

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The sensation of hunger

Hormones get released when we are hungry: NPY and AgRP from the hypothalamus, and ghrelin from the stomach.

Ghrelin levels tend to be higher in lean individuals and lower in peop...

Feeling sated
About a dozen or so hormones are responsible for making us feel full. 
  • GIP and GLP-1 are responsible for stimulating the production of insulin to regulate the metabolism of carbohydrates.
  • Other hormones are involved in slowing down the movement of food through the stomach.
  • CKK and PYY are vital in reducing the feeling of hunger. (Increased PYY causes a loss of appetite and is particularly high in patients who have a gastric band fitted to reduce the size of the stomach.)
Overeating is a habit

Even though your stomach has a hormonal system for telling your brain it is empty, it can also raise your hunger levels at specific times by learned associations, even if you had a large meal.

If you repeatedly eat chocolate after dinner when you sit on the couch, your body can start to associate sitting on the couch with eating, and you'll experience a craving.

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Intuitive eating
Intuitive eating

Rejects the diet mentality, promotes giving yourself permission to eat without labeling some foods "good” and others “bad,” acknowledging when you’re eating your feelings and accepting the body you...

Making peace with food

It doesn’t mean giving in to every craving; it means getting rid of the idea of “giving in” to “bad foods” altogether. Eat that Oreo when you want it, without any negative emotion attached, and you won’t feel like you need to eat the whole bag.

Respect your fullness

Listen for the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Intuitive eating is about understanding what foods your body feels best eating, and how to make your own food choices based on your own hunger and fullness

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Self-control is not fixed

Self-control is not a quality that remains stable throughout a person’s life, similar to IQ or personality. 

A person’s level of self-control tends to wax and to wane over the cou...

Why we fail at self-control
  • Factors such as negative mood, fatigue and alcohol play a large part in self-control failure.
  • Previous effort is one especially well studied factor that decreases self-control. All else being equal, a second self-control attempt after an initial one is more likely to fail than one that comes after a relatively restful period when no self-control was exercised.
Understanding self-control
  • Self-control is indeed a resource, but a renewable, psychological one.
  • Goals that are motivated from within—for reasons that are personally important to us—are more likely to succeed than those that are motivated from without.
  • Succeeding at self-control is more about the desire rather than the ability to do so.