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An Ancient Lesson on Taking Responsibility For Decisions

The Roman System

In Roman times, the one who created the arch stood under it as the scaffolding was removed.

We have removed responsibility from our decisions, which allows people to get all the upside and none of the downside. We have to hold people accountable to such an extent that they stand under their own arches. The person responsible for a decision should sign their name to it.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

An Ancient Lesson on Taking Responsibility For Decisions

An Ancient Lesson on Taking Responsibility For Decisions

https://fs.blog/2012/11/philosophy-of-responsibility/

fs.blog

2

Key Ideas

A responsible decision

A decision is responsible when you have to answer for it to those who are directly or indirectly affected by it.

Today, responsibility is diffused to a group, not an individual. Everyone is insulated from their mistakes and takes credit for success.

The Roman System

In Roman times, the one who created the arch stood under it as the scaffolding was removed.

We have removed responsibility from our decisions, which allows people to get all the upside and none of the downside. We have to hold people accountable to such an extent that they stand under their own arches. The person responsible for a decision should sign their name to it.

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