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People Are Taking the Wrong Lessons From Contagion

The movie Contagion

The movie Contagion

Contagion, Steven Soderbergh’s 2011 movie about a deadly pandemic has regained popularity due to the ongoing virus outbreak.
The movie is as much about the way disease gets amplified by people’s relationships to the truth, as it is about viral transmission.

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People Are Taking the Wrong Lessons From Contagion

People Are Taking the Wrong Lessons From Contagion

https://slate.com/culture/2020/01/contagion-movie-coronavirus-lessons-steven-soderbergh.html

slate.com

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Key Ideas

The movie Contagion

Contagion, Steven Soderbergh’s 2011 movie about a deadly pandemic has regained popularity due to the ongoing virus outbreak.
The movie is as much about the way disease gets amplified by people’s relationships to the truth, as it is about viral transmission.

Fear and manipulation

Contagion's subplots is about one man’s manipulation (Alan Krumwiede) of a climate of fear in order to make money. But it’s also about the way that the social conditions of the pandemic create an opening for the him o rise.
He spreads misinformation in service of selling a homeopathic “cure"; he pretends to be sick and takes the so called cure, to prove that it works.

Lessons not learned

It has become clear that the parts of the movie Contagion that probably mattered most have taught us nothing.
Compared to a single blogger selling a “cure,” the misinformation (fake cures, conspiracies, etc.) we’re facing today is far worse.

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