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Chess

The familiarity of it

The familiarity of it

Chess is more familiar than you think.

  • There is a king who doesn't do much himself because everybody "got his back."
  • There's a queen who does whatever she likes.
  • The bishops, knights, and rooks get stuff done.
  • Then the pawns are like the foot soldiers and tend to get caught quickly. Unlike the other pieces, they have prospects. If a pawn stays alive long enough and gets to the other side of the board, it gets to be queen. 

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Chess

Chess

https://www.1843magazine.com/style/built-to-last/chess

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Key Ideas

The familiarity of it

Chess is more familiar than you think.

  • There is a king who doesn't do much himself because everybody "got his back."
  • There's a queen who does whatever she likes.
  • The bishops, knights, and rooks get stuff done.
  • Then the pawns are like the foot soldiers and tend to get caught quickly. Unlike the other pieces, they have prospects. If a pawn stays alive long enough and gets to the other side of the board, it gets to be queen. 

The history of chess

  • Chess emerged in fifth-century India. In ancient India, there were no bishops, castles, or queens, but elephants, chariots, and ministers of war.
  • In early Islam, the game was played with elegant cylinders and conicals in ivory or stone.
  • In the 12th -century Norway the kings were bearded brutes with lustrous hair, flanked by shield-biting berserkers.
  • Chess standardized in the 19th century and became the Staunton version we play with today.

Chess is a great teacher

Chess either gets you hooked or makes you avoid it because it is not played enough.

The number of different possible positions on the board adds up to 10 to the power of 120. The numbers of the pieces involved are frequently quoted and always unimaginable.

But chess is a game of logical consequences and sly entrapment. It is a magnetic field of forces that are charged with energy. It is an endless pursuit that gives it an edge.

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