The history of chess - Deepstash

The history of chess

  • Chess emerged in fifth-century India. In ancient India, there were no bishops, castles, or queens, but elephants, chariots, and ministers of war.
  • In early Islam, the game was played with elegant cylinders and conicals in ivory or stone.
  • In the 12th -century Norway the kings were bearded brutes with lustrous hair, flanked by shield-biting berserkers.
  • Chess standardized in the 19th century and became the Staunton version we play with today.

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The familiarity of it

Chess is more familiar than you think.

  • There is a king who doesn't do much himself because everybody "got his back."
  • There's a queen who does whatever she likes.
  • The bishops, knights, and rooks get stuff done.
  • Then the pawns are like the foot soldiers and tend to get caught quickly. Unlike the other pieces, they have prospects. If a pawn stays alive long enough and gets to the other side of the board, it gets to be queen. 

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Chess either gets you hooked or makes you avoid it because it is not played enough.

The number of different possible positions on the board adds up to 10 to the power of 120. The numbers of the pieces involved are frequently quoted and always unimaginable.

But chess is a game of logical consequences and sly entrapment. It is a magnetic field of forces that are charged with energy. It is an endless pursuit that gives it an edge.

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Early European chess players changed the game

Early European chess players turned the chess game to reflect their society's political structure.

  • Originally, chess was a game of war. Horsemen, elephant-riding fighters, charioteers and infantry protected the "shah" and his counsellor, the "firz."
  • But Europeans changed the "shah" to a king, the "vizier" to queen, the "elephants" to bishops, the "horses" to knights, the "chariots" to castles, and the "foot soldiers" to pawns.
  • Instead of representing the units in an army, the pieces now stood in for Western social order - those who fought (knights), those who prayed (clergy) and those who worked (the rest).

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Chess for Recovering Better

Throughout history, games and sports have helped humanity to survive times of crisis by reducing anxieties and improving mental health.

While the pandemic has forced most gaming and sports activities to scale down, chess has demonstrated remarkable resilience, adaptability, and very strong convening power in times of a global crisis.

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We all feel the oppressive presence of rules. We think rules are hampering our freedom and argue that they should be broken.

It is not really the rules that are the problem, but the unjustified ones.

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