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Why Are You So Smart? Thank Mom & Your Difficult Birth - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

The secret to humans' intelligence

As unreal as it may seem, humans' intelligence is related to their birth. The growth in intelligence is very often associated to a an increase in brain size. The increase in brain size was only possible because there was also an increase in women's pelvis: the bigger the baby's brain, the bigger the mother's pelvis should be. Therefore, the women's role in the growth of humans' intelligence is often underestimated.

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Why Are You So Smart? Thank Mom & Your Difficult Birth - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

Why Are You So Smart? Thank Mom & Your Difficult Birth - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

http://nautil.us/blog/why-are-you-so-smart-thank-mom--your-difficult-birth

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Key Ideas

The secret to humans' intelligence

As unreal as it may seem, humans' intelligence is related to their birth. The growth in intelligence is very often associated to a an increase in brain size. The increase in brain size was only possible because there was also an increase in women's pelvis: the bigger the baby's brain, the bigger the mother's pelvis should be. Therefore, the women's role in the growth of humans' intelligence is often underestimated.

The development of human intelligence

Babies are born being able to develop into smarter human beings. The lifelong learning process is what allows us all to get to know things from all fields, to master topics influenced more or less by our environment. Furthermore, the fact that we are not born geniuses enables us to adjust to every possible environment. What is the most amazing, in this story, is the fact that all this process has as starting point our mother's pelvis, which set the constraint of how big our brain should be at our very birth.

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