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Focus on the Inputs

Down Shifting Effect

Down Shifting Effect

The forced days at home have disrupted sleep and increased procrastination for many, making the ordinary workday a huge challenge.

Less commute has freed up time which now goes staring at the many screens we have, which also makes us sleepless at night. Work input has decreased, and that is leading to a feeling of guilt and unexplained unhappiness.

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Focus on the Inputs

Focus on the Inputs

https://www.raptitude.com/2020/05/focus-on-the-inputs/

raptitude.com

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Key Ideas

Down Shifting Effect

The forced days at home have disrupted sleep and increased procrastination for many, making the ordinary workday a huge challenge.

Less commute has freed up time which now goes staring at the many screens we have, which also makes us sleepless at night. Work input has decreased, and that is leading to a feeling of guilt and unexplained unhappiness.

Change Your Actions

The scenario of a life turned upside down can be improved by:

  • Monitoring the quality of one’s input.
  • Pushing yourself for some exercise, which is sure to beat the blues.
  • Reading actual paper newspapers instead of mobile phone articles.
  • More fresh food, less processed food.
  • Working with work clothes on, not pajamas.
  • Bringing a change in routine and scenery.

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Choose quality over quantity

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So why not trying to learn something useful during the days when you cannot leave your house due to different reasons?

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