Our Immunity - Deepstash
Our Immunity

Our Immunity

Immunity is defined as the set of defenses, that our bodies possess, which has the role to protect us against pathogens and to fight against infections.

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  • The need to be exposed to a pathogen or to the antigen of a pathogen, which leads to the production of antibodies
  • The cells involved are of three types: T cells, B cells and anti-presenting cells
  • Immunity is acquired after several exposures to the antigen
  • Active immunity can last up to an entire life
  • This type of immunity can cause at most some autoimmune disease and allergies, however, there are no issues generally.

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Passive immunity refers to the creation of immunity by introducing antibodies from outside the organism, such as the injection of antivenom after having been bitten by a snake.

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Among the features of passive immunity, the most known are:

  • This type of immunity does not require exposure to antigen or to an infectious agent
  • The response to an infectious agent is immediate
  • The immunity is effective on short term
  • The so-called 'serum sickness' is one of the effects of the exposure to antisera.

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By active immunity, we generally understand the resistance that our immune system shows against pathogens.

By the so-called 'clonal selection', enough antibodies are built up in order to help our organism fight off colds or different diseases.

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There are several immunity categories:

  • Nonspecific defenses: these work against all foreign matter and pathogens
  • Specific defenses: these are specialized in fighting against particular threats
  • Innate immunity: natural immunity that protects one from birth until death
  • Acquired immunity: it is the third line of defense, which offers protection against specific types of pathogens.

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Social media is super quick to spread nutritional advice, home remedies, and bizarre ideas. Some are straightforward like seeking out foods rich in Vitamin C and antioxidants, many pseudoscientists are peddling products like probiotics, cayenne pepper, and green tea as ways to protect us from the virus, which they cannot.

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1. Each part of the immune system has a unique function.  

“Think of the immune system like the military, each part has a different role"

The first line of defense is the white blood cells, who are first to recognise pathogens and fight off infection. Lymphocytes, a specific type of white blood cell, work to allow the body to remember the invading microbes to fight them faster in future infections. 

Other parts of the immune system include the bone marrow, where white blood cells are produced; lymph nodes, which produce and store infection-fighting cells throughout the body; and the spleen, which helps control and clean the amount of blood in the body.

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Was learning about communicable diseases in biology, and found the process of immunity really interesting in the context of the COVID 19 pandemic.

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Familiarising with allergic reactions-

Hypersensitivity reactions are an overreaction of the immune system to an antigen which would not normally trigger an immune response. The antigen may be something which would in most people be ignored – peanuts, for example, or it may originate from the body. In either case, the damage and clinical symptoms result from the body’s response to the substance rather than damage caused by the substance itself.

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