Take It Or Leave It - Deepstash
Take It Or Leave It

Take It Or Leave It

The soft ultimatum tactic of the words ‘take it or leave it’ creates a false closure, benefiting the negotiators.

They apply this method to falsely limit your options, by only giving you two, whereas there are a lot more.

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MORE IDEAS FROM How to Respond to “Take It or Leave It”

Rather than getting influenced by the limited set of options provided to you by the other party (which tricks you into a vortex of limited options), it is better to adopt a choice mindset. One has to let go of the internal limitation of having no choice (which is an illusion, of course). There is always a choice, there is always an option.

Taken to an extreme, this illusion is what triggers suicides, as our limiting mind feels that there is no choice except ending one’s own life, which is entirely false.

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Thinking about choices makes us ignore the false ultimatums provided by the other party. Have the inner confidence to believe that there is still room for negotiation to get what you want, instead of being lulled into thinking that you have to compromise.

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RELATED IDEA

The most successful negotiators don't entertain dirty tricks in negotiation but instead strive to reach agreements that are satisfactory to both parties.

But if you find yourself on the receiving end of something that doesn't feel quite right, provided you recognise what's happening, you can address the situation and swiftly bring it back to a better place.

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  • Integrative negotiators: create value between negotiating counterparts.
  • Distributive negotiators: maximize their claim to value in the negotiation at hand.
  • Crisis negotiators: apply advanced conflict resolution skills strategically according to context.

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Refers to your “best alternative to a negotiated agreement,” or the best outcome you can expect if you fail to reach agreement at the bargaining table with your counterpart. 

An evaluation of your BATNA is critical if you are to establish the threshold at which you will reject an offer. 

Effective negotiators determine their BATNAs before talks begin.

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