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Intermittent fasting: if you're struggling to lose weight, this might be why

Recovering calorie deficit

While intermittent fasting has as main purpose to make the large calorie deficit remain unchanged after a period of fasting or low-calorie dieting, studies have shown that actually a combination of eating just a bit more and doing less physical activity can help recover half of this calorie deficit.

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Intermittent fasting: if you're struggling to lose weight, this might be why

Intermittent fasting: if you're struggling to lose weight, this might be why

https://theconversation.com/intermittent-fasting-if-youre-struggling-to-lose-weight-this-might-be-why-123498

theconversation.com

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Key Ideas

Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting is a process that enables you to lose weight by mixing a low-calorie diet with unrestricted eating throughout the week. The issue is that many individuals tend to disobey this diet without even wanting it.

Intermittent fasting is a way of losing weight that favours flexibility over calorie counting. It restricts the time you are allowed to eat, which reduces calorie intake by limiting opportunities to eat.

Recovering calorie deficit

While intermittent fasting has as main purpose to make the large calorie deficit remain unchanged after a period of fasting or low-calorie dieting, studies have shown that actually a combination of eating just a bit more and doing less physical activity can help recover half of this calorie deficit.

Intermittent fasting and its flexibility

When deciding on the best way to lose weight, intermittent fasting might be just the proper way for you. Due to its flexibility, this type of diet enables you to lose weight while still enjoying good meals.

However, it is entirely up to you to decide on the outcome of the diet, whatever this is.

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Intermittent fasting...

 ...is an increasingly popular eating pattern that involves not eating or sharply restricting your food intake for certain periods of time. It may boost your health. However, fa...

Popular regimens of fasting:
  • The 5:2 Pattern: restrict your calorie intake for two days per week (500 calories per day for women and 600 for men).
  • The 6:1 Pattern: similar to the 5:2, but there’s only one day of reduced calorie intake instead of two.
  • “Eat Stop Eat”: a 24-hour complete fast, 1–2 times per week.
  • The 16:8 Pattern: only consuming food in an eight-hour window and fasting for 16 hours a day, every day of the week.
Keep fasting periods short

Longer periods of fasting increase your risk of side effects, such as dehydration, dizziness, and fainting. 

The best way to avoid these side effects is to stick to shorter fasting periods of up to 24 hours — especially when you’re just starting out.

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Fasting
It involves eating no or very little food and caloric beverages for periods ranging from 12 hours to three weeks.

Human studies on fasting are only just beginning to ramp up. And while we ha...

Popular types of fasting
  • Intermittent fasts: eating no food or massively cutting back on calorie intake only intermittently;
  • Time-restricted feeding: involves consuming calories only for a 4- to 6-hour window each day.
  • Periodic fasts, the most extreme, typically last several days or longer. 
  • Fasting-mimicking diet, a plant-based diet that involves eating very few calories for several days each month. 
Religious fasting

Many religious groups incorporate periods of fasting into their rituals, though the focus there tends to be more spiritual than health-oriented: Muslims fast from dawn until dusk during the month of Ramadan, Christians, Jews, Buddhists, and Hindus who traditionally fast on designated days of the week or calendar year.

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People struggle to keep weight off

Researchers have observed weight regain following weight loss across a range of populations and types of weight-loss diets.

Why long-term weight loss is so hard

The brain’s response to caloric restriction tends to be to increase cravings for foods that are highly rewarding and reducing our perception of being full. 

Diets frequently fail because they have an endpoint and are not a real lifestyle change. Maintaining a lifestyle that promotes a healthy weight and metabolism is often a lifelong journey. 

Maintaining weight loss

The actual food you eat isn’t the main thing that enables you to keep weight off.

Maintaining a weight-reduced state is a lifelong journey and many dietary approaches can work to facilitate weight loss and keep it off.