Failure - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The learning opportunities hiding in our failures

Failure

Failure

Success is sought after by most, while failure is looked down upon, even seen as something shameful.

More than success, it is our failures, errors and rejections that provide us with better learnings, and pathways towards eventual success, if we study them.

378 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The learning opportunities hiding in our failures

The learning opportunities hiding in our failures

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200616-the-learning-opportunities-hiding-in-our-failures

bbc.com

4

Key Ideas

Failure

Success is sought after by most, while failure is looked down upon, even seen as something shameful.

More than success, it is our failures, errors and rejections that provide us with better learnings, and pathways towards eventual success, if we study them.

The Ostrich Effect

Once we have invested our time, effort and resources in something, we tend to avoid correcting ourselves in real-time if we are off-track.

Inversely, when people engage in mental contrasting, anticipating the upcoming obstacles, they tend to succeed.

Failure Is A Goldmine

Sharing information on failure among peers means less work overall, and better success for the entire team, as team members do not have to reinvent the wheel by making the same mistake to learn from it.

People do not share failure as it hurts their self-esteem, but if we keep the personal equation aside, a lot can be gained from the collective knowledge of what didn’t work.

Screw-Up Nights

Some young organizations have started the trend of sharing failure among their teams and even the entire organization. These are great opportunities for employees to talk about their mistakes and admit when they were wrong, while the rest benefit from the lessons learned.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Fear of failure

We are taught from a young age that failure is bad and something to fear. But, failure is an excellent stepping stone to success. 

We never learn to move out of our comfort zone ...

Failure is temporary

... and failure is good even if it feels really bad when it happens.

 Look for the greater message of the experience and expect it to, eventually, turn out for the good.

Routine failing

It means you are actually active, doing something, moving forward.

We limit ourselves, and we impede our ability to make big things happen when we buy into what society says will work or not work.

We must take a leap, take calculated risks, and be patient for the results. We don’t need to have everything worked out beforehand.

one more idea

Clarify what you really want

Noticing and admitting our mistakes helps us get in touch with our commitments--what we really want to be, do, and have. 

Working on possible solutions, redefining what we want or...

You can be flawed and be loved

People who love and care about us will stick with us through all our flaws and floundering. Our not so perfectness is what makes us unique and we are loved for it. So we should give ourselves a break.

Accept your fallibility

Facing mistakes often takes us straight to the heart of our fears. And when we experience and face those fears, they can disappear. 

When we are stuck and admit that we can't do it alone it sends a signal and opens the door for help to show up. People, resources, and solutions will appear, especially when we ask for help.

6 more ideas

Second-person self-talk and increased performance
Second-person self-talk and increased performance

A series of studies have confirmed that speaking to yourself can influence your performance. When comparing the effectiveness of self-talk using first person pronouns "I can d...

Research on self-talk for endurance
  • Individual variation. Not everyone benefits from the second-person self-talk. People with more narcissistic tendencies use first-person pronouns more frequently, making them more or less sensitive to the effect.
  • Customized self-talk for athletes. Framing self-statements in a positive light tend to be encouraging and actionable. For example, changing "keep grinding" to "I (You) can keep going."
Time is not money
Time is not money

Even if these two share some connections, time isn't money. Time is energy, money is a thing. And they each have power over our lives.

Money is infinite but time is...

Disrupting the time-money relationship

Investing and passive income disrupt the time-money relationship.

To make money without having to trade any of your time frees up your time to ultimately do things that are more important to you.

The best investing strategy
  • Make as much money as you can
  • Keep your expenses low
  • Invest the difference
  • The more you invest, the faster your money will compound and bring you more money
  • Sit back and earn money with no effort. You are no longer trading your time for money.

2 more ideas

Defining group norms
Defining group norms

Group norms are the set of informal and formal ground rules that specify how people interact. The rules help members of the group determine how to behave. Advantages of clear g...

Intentionally create group norms

Every team has rules, but few are intentionally crafted. This could have a negative impact. For example:

  • In a team of two, it's easy to create short back-and-forth emails. As more team members join, it becomes more complex keeping everyone in the loop. Emails may include reply-alls about weekend plans and real-time decision-making, leading to unread emails and lost information.
  • A single individual dictates the rules for the group. He may inadvertently communicate late at night that can affect an entire company.
How to create healthy group norms

Setting up norms is easiest when the team is first created. It may take a special meeting at the start, but it saves time and diminish problems down the road.

Shifting group norms in an established team is possible, too. Cultivate positive behavioral expectations on high-functioning teams.

6 more ideas

The Default Choice
The Default Choice

While prompted to make a decision with a given set of options, a person has the freedom to refuse to actively make a choice.

The decision-making process of the person is affected by the

How Economic Incentives Affect Our Choices

If a person is told about the economic incentives of their selection, they are more likely to make an active choice.

If the person is told about the pros and cons of their decision, they have a logical reason to make the desired choice, as it can minimize any potential loss.

Rewards And Penalties

Organizations need to understand when to provide a reward to the person making the choice to promote active choice-making, or to initiate a penalty to make them provide a concrete answer.

The "fresh start" effect
The "fresh start" effect

The fresh start effect is defined as the feeling all individuals know at the beginning or end of an experience, week etc. It says that people are better at tackling their goals when they st...

Keep track of your performance

In order to reach your goal, learn to rely on performance metrics, in order to understand where exactly you stand in terms of performance. To allow a successful tracking of personal progress:

  • Define a deadline
  • Use a simple system to track your progress
  • Ask for help from a trustworthy person if you cannot do it yourself.*
Think big

After a period of success, you most certainly want to keep doing the things in the same way, as it has allowed you to achieve everything that was on your list, rather than starting all over again.

In order to make sure that it does happen like this, consider making a visual that can enable you to go over your past progress while keep your motivation alive or keeping track of your progress by means of monthly reports.

one more idea

Consequences Of Too Little Sleep
Consequences Of Too Little Sleep

It is common knowledge that we need to sleep to be our best. And constant sleep loss has serious effects, including death.

Sleep is a neurological activity, and still, sleep-deprived cr...

No Sleep = No Restoration

Sleep, according to deep research on flies, has a function of reversing the ancient biochemical process of oxidation. Without sleep, there is no restoration possible.

Sleep studies prove it is worse than starvation, as early studies (19th century) conducted on puppies showed that they died in about five days if deprived of sleep and kept in motion.

Reactive Oxygen Species

... or ROS is a molecule that builds up in the intestines of animals that are denied sleep.

  • Studies conducted on fruit flies and mice showed rising levels of ROS when kept in sleep deprivation.

  • Antioxidants, when given to sleep-deprived flies, made them healthy and active again, proving that the artificial restoration is possible.

one more idea

To lie is human
To lie is human
  • Lying is something that most people are very practiced in. We lie in big and small ways, to strangers, co-workers, friends, and loved ones.
  • Researchers found that people lie on ave...
Lying increases with maturity

The increase in lying is driven by the development of the ability to see the world from someone else's perspective. We gain an understanding of the beliefs, intentions, and knowledge of others.

The more we lie, the easier it becomes. Among two-year-olds, only 30 percent are untruthful. Among three-year-olds, 50 percent lie. By eight, kids learn to mask their lying by deliberately giving a wrong answer or making their statement seem like a guess.

Why we limit our lies

We like to see ourselves as honest because we have internalized honesty as a value taught to us. We generally place limits on how much we are willing to lie.

one more idea

Biases...
Biases...

... specifically cognitive biases, are your unchecked tendencies to make decisions or take actions in an irrational way. 

Instead of making decisions based on facts and data, you ...

Biases = shortcuts for processing information

The brain creates shortcuts in order to make fast decisions when it hits information or inspiration overload

These shortcuts form unconscious biases so it’s easier for your brain to categorize information and make quick judgments over and over again.

Self-serving Bias
It causes you to claim your successes and ignore your failures. 

This means that when something good happens, you take the credit, but when something bad happens, you blame it on external factors.

Self-serving bias may manifest at work when you receive critical feedback. Instead of keeping an open mind, you may put up a defense when your manager or team member is sharing feedback or constructive criticism.

6 more ideas