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How to start drawing

The benefits of putting pen to paper

Drawing develops the capacity for close observation, introspection, patience, and humility.

Drawing is also an important problem-solving tool, because it helps you visualize ideas and concepts.

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How to start drawing

How to start drawing

https://qz.com/quartzy/1412635/how-to-draw-tips-to-overcome-the-fear-of-drawing/

qz.com

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Key Ideas

“The significance of drawing in human history is not artistic; it has to do with the acquisition, consolidation and transmission of human knowledge. Drawing is about learning. Draw to understand, to record, to synthesize, not to perform. Draw to learn.”

“The significance of drawing in human history is not artistic; it has to do with the acquisition, consolidation and transmission of human knowledge. Drawing is about learning. Draw to understand, to record, to synthesize, not to perform. Draw to learn.”

Drawing doesn't have to be just an art

Drawing doesn't have to be just about making art. Drawing is rather “a tool for learning above all else." (D.B. Dowd)

The benefits of putting pen to paper

Drawing develops the capacity for close observation, introspection, patience, and humility.

Drawing is also an important problem-solving tool, because it helps you visualize ideas and concepts.

Get in the habit of drawing

  • Sharing or even saving your doodles isn’t important. They also don't need to be finished.
  • Draw what’s in front of you. Any object will do.
  • If you’re stuck on finding a subject, follow a prompt ( e.g. Inktober’s “prompt list": words are meant to spark your imagination on each day of the month).
  • Try sketching your meeting notes. Use as few words as possible.
  • Start with something easy like drawing on a greeting card or drawing a small caricature of your face after your signature.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Drawing is a Natural Process

For centuries, schools have established the normal, natural process of drawing as an art, like painting. Drawing as a creative process is forgotten and distorted beyond recognition.

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Drawing as a Tool
  • Drawing is a problem-solving visual tool. It helps us think better and provides clarity to a cluttered mind.

  • Authentic pen and paper drawing help us break free from the limiting domains of technology which digital tools like Google image search or drawing software provide, indirectly hindering our creativity.

  • Drawing also makes us slow down, observe and pay attention.

  • Drawing promotes close observation, analytical thinking, patience, and even humility, making it one of the best ways to learn.

Remote Workshops

Collaborative workshops in a conference room where bright minds work shoulder-to-shoulder is an effective way to foster innovative ideas and forging intangible connections.

Remote worksho...

Clarity of the Workshop’s Value

Workshops are ‘co-creation’ time with people who have varied disciplines, backgrounds, and perspectives. 

To make these people show up, we need to make the invitations intriguing and something that provides value to the participant. It helps to send the invitations in advance, with follow-ups.

Conferencing Tools

Video Conferencing is a must-have for a remote workshop, while chat tools are not effective. In case there is any audio or video problem, phone in and take everyone into a conference call with your phone.

Collaborative tools: The whiteboards, sharpies, and post-it-notes can be replicated virtually with software like Invision Freehand for example.

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Richard Feynman (1918–1988) "The Great Explainer”

He is considered to be one of the most important physicists of all time.

Feynman was brilliant, eloquent, and an exquisitely passionate thinker who stands unequivocally for his...
The Feynman Technique
The Feynman technique for teaching and communication is a mental model (a breakdown of his personal thought process) to convey information using to the point thoughts and simple language.

Feynman started to record and connect the things he did know with those he did not know, resulting in a thorough notebook of subjects that had been disassembled, translated, and recorded.

We can use this same model to learn new concepts.

“In order to talk to each other, we have to have words, and that’s all right. It’s a good idea to try to see the difference, and it’s a good idea to know when we are teaching the tools of sc...

“In order to talk to each other, we have to have words, and that’s all right. It’s a good idea to try to see the difference, and it’s a good idea to know when we are teaching the tools of science, such as words, and when we are teaching science itself.” 

Richard Feynman

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Visual note-taking
Visual note-taking

Using simple words and pictures helps us to see connections between pieces of information, get a better idea of what we understand and what we don’t, and remember it for later.

...

Helpful tips for trying visual note-taking
  • Turn your paper 90 degrees so it’s longer than it is tall. 
  • Pair images with your own words.
  • Arrange them on the page in a way that makes sense to you
  • The images don’t have to be complicated or artsy. They don’t have to make sense to anybody else. They just have to be meaningful to you.
Start Your Art
Start Your Art

Getting artistic is good for health, and your mental well-being. The creation process helps you:

  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Improves your mood.
  • It helps...
Everyone can be an Artist

When we think of 'art' we normally think of a painter, applying the brush on a canvas. But any person, having a creative skill in any activity, can be an artist.

The way a person talks to others, or how one writes, can be a creative expression. The ways a person can express his or her 'art' is infinite.

Focus on The Act of Creation

Find out what you enjoy, what you loved as a kid, or what engages you, and do that. It can be finger painting, baking, cooking, collaging, oil painting, weaving, writing screenplays, anything that doesn't' make you tired while you do it.

The act of creation is itself a reward, and going for what you love doing without any expectations or stress makes the real art come out.

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Solitude and Creativity
Solitude and Creativity

The difficult emotions we feel when we're alone actually transform us into intense observers, aware of subtle details that normally go unnoticed.

Most of the time, this is uncomfortable (bec...

Touch - a powerful form of communication

Digital tools are a weak substitute for a physical community. And screens don’t allow for touch, which is a powerful form of communication.

Physical contact, from friends, loved ones, even acquaintances and strangers, has the ability to lower cortisol levels and ease anxiety.

Work towards something larger

A great way to fight loneliness is to work toward a larger goal, one that is centered around teamwork and collaboration.

Focusing on a shared vision helps disrupt the lonely brain’s destructive loops, allowing us to let our guard down and reintegrate ourselves into the social fold.

Intelligence is not genius
Intelligence is not genius

Genius is not about having an extraordinarily high IQ, or even about being smart. It is not about finishing Mensa exercises in record time or mastering fourteen languages at the age of seven.

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Geniuses and problem solving

Leonardo da Vinci believed you begin by learning how to restructure the problem by looking at it from many different angles.

In order to creatively solve a problem, the thinker should not use the usual approach that is based on past experience. Geniuses use several different perspectives to solve an existing problem and thereby also identify new ones.

Making your thoughts visible

_Galileo Galilei revolutionized science by making his idea visible with diagrams, maps, and drawings. Einstein believed that words and numbers as they are spoken did not play a significant role in his thinking process.

Geniuses seem to develop a skill to display information in visual and spatial forms, rather than only mathematical or verbal lines.

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