Fermenting Cereals - Deepstash
Fermenting Cereals

Fermenting Cereals

Some archaeological evidence shows that the Natufians enjoyed alcoholic beverages like beer by fermenting cereals, serving as an initial motivation to farm.

This may have led to advanced agriculture in the ancient civilization, with grains and cereals remaining a better choice due to its ability to be stored, unlike the forage for wild animals and fruits.

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Neolithic Jericho

It is known by some as the world’s oldest city, settled in 9000 BCE. The city and its surrounding areas are believed to be the first places in the world where humans evolved from their hunter-gatherer ways and moved towards more civil activities like agriculture, domestication of plants, and farming.

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It is estimated that the early hunter-gatherers, called ‘Natufians’ settled gradually in this oasis of a city, domesticating dogs and other animals on the way.

Agriculture and farming would have been mostly trial and error, with them noticing the scattered seeds producing edible plants. The ancient figs would probably be the first cultivated crop.

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Advanced Civilization

Over the course of time, the residents of Jericho began cultivating plants and even developed an irrigation system to tackle large harvests. To tackle attacks from neighbouring places and raiders, they built a wall in 8000 BCE, the oldest known protective wall.

They even build a watchtower, whose shadow acted as a way to mark the summer solstice, which may have had significance in those days.

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Modern Jericho is a favourite among tourists and history buffs. It still has never-ending archaeological digs happening, and among the old ruins of the new city, there are many cafes selling Arabian food.

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The city has a history which is well known in biblical literature, and where the ancient Israelites conquered in 1400 BCE, after they escaped slavery in Egypt.

In pop culture, Bing Crosby and Elvis Presley have covered the ‘Battle of Jericho’ song, about the famous wall.

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Energy Is The Key

The average human being in a developed country uses more like 100 times the amount than a resting human being does to sustain their metabolism, if you add in the energy needed to get around, build and heat our homes, grow our food and all the other things our species gets up to.

Unlike virtually every other creature on Earth, human beings do much more with energy than just power our own metabolism.

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James Suzman's book titled Work: A Deep History, From the Stone Age to the Age of Robots examines our fixation with being productive, diving into the reason we are working hard in the first place.

Modern work, according to the author, is analogous with farming, which fundamentally changed our relationship with time, land, history and each other.

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  • The Paleo diet was born in academic circles in the '70s. Walter Voegtlin wrote that modern kinfolk would be much healthier if only they returned to the pre-agricultural food habits of the Paleolithic era.
  • An academic evangelizer, Loren Cordain, trademarked and built a brand around advocating for hunter-gatherer eating.  Celebrities and low-carb enthusiasts have helped fuel the craze.
  • Our ancestors didn't actually eat this way. "There is no one 'Paleo diet.' There are millions of Paleo diets. People in East Africa ate different foods than people in West Africa versus the Middle East, and South America, and North America." Daniel Lieberman
  • According to evidence, hunter-gatherers ate plenty of grains and other carbs.
  • Our bodies have evolved to eat modern foods.
  • Paleo diets do help people lose weight — but so do all restrictive diets.

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