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Centers of Progress: Jericho (Agriculture)

Jericho: Literature And Pop Culture

The city has a history which is well known in biblical literature, and where the ancient Israelites conquered in 1400 BCE, after they escaped slavery in Egypt.

In pop culture, Bing Crosby and Elvis Presley have covered the ‘Battle of Jericho’ song, about the famous wall.

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Centers of Progress: Jericho (Agriculture)

Centers of Progress: Jericho (Agriculture)

https://humanprogress.org/article.php?p=2624

humanprogress.org

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Key Ideas

Neolithic Jericho

It is known by some as the world’s oldest city, settled in 9000 BCE. The city and its surrounding areas are believed to be the first places in the world where humans evolved from their hunter-gatherer ways and moved towards more civil activities like agriculture, domestication of plants, and farming.

Settlement of Early Hunter-Gatherers

It is estimated that the early hunter-gatherers, called ‘Natufians’ settled gradually in this oasis of a city, domesticating dogs and other animals on the way.

Agriculture and farming would have been mostly trial and error, with them noticing the scattered seeds producing edible plants. The ancient figs would probably be the first cultivated crop.

Fermenting Cereals

Some archaeological evidence shows that the Natufians enjoyed alcoholic beverages like beer by fermenting cereals, serving as an initial motivation to farm.

This may have led to advanced agriculture in the ancient civilization, with grains and cereals remaining a better choice due to its ability to be stored, unlike the forage for wild animals and fruits.

Advanced Civilization

Over the course of time, the residents of Jericho began cultivating plants and even developed an irrigation system to tackle large harvests. To tackle attacks from neighbouring places and raiders, they built a wall in 8000 BCE, the oldest known protective wall.

They even build a watchtower, whose shadow acted as a way to mark the summer solstice, which may have had significance in those days.

Modern Jericho

Modern Jericho is a favourite among tourists and history buffs. It still has never-ending archaeological digs happening, and among the old ruins of the new city, there are many cafes selling Arabian food.

Jericho: Literature And Pop Culture

The city has a history which is well known in biblical literature, and where the ancient Israelites conquered in 1400 BCE, after they escaped slavery in Egypt.

In pop culture, Bing Crosby and Elvis Presley have covered the ‘Battle of Jericho’ song, about the famous wall.

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