Happiness and adversity - Deepstash

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True happiness isn't about being happy all the time

Happiness and adversity

Leading a happy life is not about avoiding hard times.

A happy life is about being able to respond to adversity in a way that allows you to grow from the experience. And experiencing adversity can make us more resilient and lead us to take action in our lives, such as changing jobs or overcoming hardship.

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Future-mindedness

Even though our predictions aren’t always accurate, the simple act of contemplating the future might be a key to well-being.

It usually is a 2-steps process: first, we dream big and imagine fantasy outcomes; then, we “get real” and come up with pragmatic plans.

Happiness
Happiness

Happiness is when a person feels satisfaction, contentment, and elation in their life. It is a fulfilling feeling to have despite it having varying definitions.

The term is...

The two fundamental components of 'happiness'
  1. Emotional balance - We all experience positive and negative feelings from time to time. How one handles their emotional state is crucial as to how they radiate this energy towards everything they have going on in their life;
  2. Life satisfaction - People experience emotions differently whenever an event occurs in their lives. How you feel about your own life - from your relationships to personal achievements - matter to your happiness.
Measuring your happiness

Here are questions you should ask yourself to know if you are happy:

  • Do you feel like you have the life you want? Are you working towards the life that you want?
  • Does your environment bring you peace of mind?
  • Have you accomplished the things you want in your life? Are these goals important to you?
  • Are you content as you are right now? What are the things you're doing that is contributing to your happiness?
  • Have you stopped and wondered if you feel more positively than you were before?
Positive psychology: the "science of happiness"
Positive psychology: the "science of happiness"

The "science of happiness" was born as a result of Martin Seligman's (the father of positive psychology) endeavour to approach psychology beyond the idea of r...

The plasticity of the brain

Neuroscience research demonstrates the power of positive psychology:

  • Studies showed that repetitive negative thinking causes one pattern of brain activity, while positive thoughts can produce another.
  • Practices such as gratitude, mindfulness, and physical activity can change certain pathways within the brain.
  • Medication can also stimulate or suppress brain activity. Martin Seligman found a combined treatment plan of medication and therapy can help patients recover sooner.
Positive psychology strategies

Positive psychology treatments focus on four fundamental areas:

  • Strengths: Finding one's inner strength and resilience.
  • Quality of life: Goals and achievements should be underpinned by meaning and purpose.
  • Hope: Ensuring a positive attitude when faced with life's trials and knowing that they have the support to cope.
  • Wellbeing: A sense of environmental mastery, full engagement with the world, and personal satisfaction.