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When To Influence People, When To Inform Them, And How To Know The Difference

Present Your Position First

  • While pitching to decision-makers, the normal way of establishing the background and context, followed by the conclusion (that you wish is implemented) does not work.
  • You need to pitch the conclusion first and then back it up with reasons and context.
  • Focus on the people aspect instead of plain facts.

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When To Influence People, When To Inform Them, And How To Know The Difference

When To Influence People, When To Inform Them, And How To Know The Difference

https://www.fastcompany.com/3062679/when-to-influence-people-when-to-inform-them-and-how-to-kn

fastcompany.com

4

Key Ideas

Influencing Authoritative Figures

While educating a higher-up about a particular subject, we assume that we are the experts and somehow have power over others listening to us impart knowledge.

But influencing authoritative figures takes more than just expertise and the art of persuasion requires us to get off the pedestal and relinquish the power that we think we have.

Learning To Deliver Information

The audience who are the decision-makers will not be sold just by the logic of your proposal and how much sense it makes - you have to package it in a way that is at the right level with your audience, in straightforward terms.

It also helps to ensure that the leaders who are listening to you feel smart.

Coming Across As Trustworthy

While making the pitch to an audience, the personal trust the presenter has built with them is more important than the quality of the proposal.

While it is natural to focus on the content and assume that one’s ideas will be accepted based on merit, the person who comes across as trustworthy, thoughtful and having sound judgement is the one who is able to make the best deal.

Present Your Position First

  • While pitching to decision-makers, the normal way of establishing the background and context, followed by the conclusion (that you wish is implemented) does not work.
  • You need to pitch the conclusion first and then back it up with reasons and context.
  • Focus on the people aspect instead of plain facts.

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Steel Yourself

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Principles of persuasion
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