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Basics of Identity

Identity and our values

Identity and our values

Identity is mainly concerned with the question: “Who am I?” What does it mean to be who I am?

Identity relates to the values that guide the choices we make (relationships, career, etc.). These choices reflect who we are and what we value.

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Basics of Identity

Basics of Identity

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/science-choice/201412/basics-identity

psychologytoday.com

6

Key Ideas

Few people choose their identities

Most of us just incorporate the values of our parents or the dominant cultures (for example, the pursuit of materialism, power, and appearance). This is risky, because these values may not feel authentic and can lead us to live an unfulfilling life.

Not having a consistent sense of identity will lead to uncertainty about what one wants to do in life. In contrast, people that live fulfilled lives stay true to their values and pursue meaningful goals.

We can hold multiple identities

You can be a teacher, a mother or friend. Each has its own sense and assumptions that are internalized as identity.

A major mission of self-development during early adolescence is the separation of different selves as a function of social context with an awareness of the potential contradictions.

Finding oneself

Psychologists consider that identity development is a question of “finding yourself” by matching your skills with available social roles.

Defining yourself within a social world becomes one of the most difficult choices you will have to make.

Goals required for identity formation

  1. Finding and developing your personal potentials (those things that the person can do better than other things).
  2. Choosing your purpose in life.
  3. Finding opportunities to implement that potential and purpose.

Identity is never “final”

It continues to develop through our lives. Knowing our identity increases self-esteem and reduces depression and anxiety.

When we are doing what we think we should be doing, we are happy.

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