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Defining Art

Defining Art

  • Art does not have a universal definition, though it is generally believed that it is an intentional and conscious creation of something that requires imagination and skill.
  • It can be thought of as a symbol of what it means to be human, manifested in physical form for others to see and interpret.
  • The word ‘art’ originates from the Latin word ‘ars’ that means skill or craft.
  • Art, like beauty, is subjective, and its valuation and definition changes as time goes by.
  • To understand art one has to see it’s essential nature and the social impact or importance it generates.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

  • Art as Representation or Mimesis. Representation of art as an imitation or copying became the mainstream meaning of art in Greece. Plato first developed the idea of art as “mimesis,” which, in Greek, means copying or imitation. How immaculately it replicated the original ...

  • From the 11th century until the end of the 17th century, the definition of art was anything that was done with expertise, with the result of knowledge and practice.
  • The Romantic period of the 18th century, beauty became the main criteria for defining good a...

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Most important art movements

  • Medieval art
  • Renaissance 1300–1600
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