Making sense of the city - Deepstash

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Why we tell each other urban legends

Making sense of the city

People in 19th-century Britain used folk tales to adjust to the experience of city living. Folklore was continually updated. It expressed concerns about urban development, the threat of strangers, and a shrinking sense of community as people no longer knew one another.


In Victorian London, a tale was told about Spring-heeled Jack, a supposedly clawed, fire-breathing ghost that terrorised villages. The figure thrived in rumour. However, no person who had actually 'seen' the ghost could be found.

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Old Vs New Stories

The stories in pop culture in the last century tend to be moralistic and have a clear demarcation of good and bad.

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Colour Vs Black and White

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