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4 daily practices that foster emotional resilience

Emotional Resilience

Emotional Resilience

This is the ability to handle a stressful event or experience without destroying one’s resolve, sense of purpose, or sanity.

An emotionally resilient person can channelize and metabolize negative feelings instead of being overwhelmed or paralyzed by them. One does not have to wait for dire circumstances to practise emotional resilience, and a few daily rituals are sufficient to build our sense of balance and help us achieve more in life while boosting our mental health and immunity.

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4 daily practices that foster emotional resilience

4 daily practices that foster emotional resilience

https://www.fastcompany.com/90532356/4-daily-practices-that-foster-emotional-resilience

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Emotional Resilience

This is the ability to handle a stressful event or experience without destroying one’s resolve, sense of purpose, or sanity.

An emotionally resilient person can channelize and metabolize negative feelings instead of being overwhelmed or paralyzed by them. One does not have to wait for dire circumstances to practise emotional resilience, and a few daily rituals are sufficient to build our sense of balance and help us achieve more in life while boosting our mental health and immunity.

Journaling to increase emotional stamina

Reflective journaling as a daily practice helps us improve our emotional stamina.

Writing down our experiences leads to new insights and a deeper understanding of our behaviour and actions. Writing down your failures and successes also helps us self-analyze our life in an objective, detached way. One can choose a pen and paper or digital format to write and make it a point to write when one experiences highs and lows in life.

Self-Compassion

We have to take care not to damage our self-esteem and our sense of self-worth by being judgemental about ourselves.

Embracing one’s imperfect moments with kindness and grace, makes us see the positive aspects of the situation and helps us learn from our mistakes. Meditation and certain thought exercises that steer our mind towards positivity, help us in being compassionate towards ourselves.

Gratitude and happiness chemicals

  • Resilience and gratitude have a connection at the neurotransmitter level our of brains.
  • Happiness chemicals like serotonin and dopamine are released as we express gratitude, lighting up the two areas of our brain called the amygdala and hippocampus, which regulate our emotions and memory.
  • A daily gratitude practise helps us feel content and even meditative, living life in a deeper dimension, filling our days with balance and perspective.

Hope and finding the joy in what is going right in life

Though it is not a practice, hope helps us cope with our day-to-day stresses, letting us find joy in the things that are going right, or shifting our focus to something bigger than ourselves.

Being close to nature, and spending time doing something one loves, or with someone special, help us find our joy and hope, taking the sting out of the (inevitable) sufferings of life.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Resilience

Resilience is the the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress. 

Resilient people are more likely to bounce bac...

Resilience is a skill

Resilience isn’t something you’re born with, but something you build. 

Psychologists say it’s comprised of behaviors, thoughts and actions that anyone can learn — a skill that can be improved, just like running or speaking a new language.

Common patterns in building resilience
  • Relying on others. Resilience has a lot to do with leaning on the people around you and with developing strong, supportive connections.
  • Trust your own abilities. Keep a list of accomplishments you’re proud of to serve as a reminder of the times you’ve been resilient before.
  • Be kind to yourself. Give yourself permission to set physical, mental and emotional boundaries.
  • Change your outlook. While you can’t always control the situation, you do have control over how you respond to it. Cultivate optimism in the face of adversity.
  • Take the next step, even if it’s small. Build hope. Make a list that includes a goal, steps to achieve it, potential obstacles and strategies to overcome them.
Finding your purpose

Many seem to think that purpose comes from your unique gifts and sets you apart from other people. That is only partly true.

Meaningful goals that foster a sense of purpose are ones that can ...

Read

Reading connects us to people across time and space.

  • Research shows that those who read the Bible more tended to have a stronger sense of purpose.
  • Reading fiction also seems to make a difference. By seeing purpose in the lives of other people, we are more likely to see it in our own.
Find purpose in suffering

Finding purpose is not just an intellectual pursuit, it is something we need to feel. That's why purpose can grow out of suffering.

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Emotional Regulation

It means having the skills to control your behavior, emotions and thoughts in the pursuit of long-term goals.

Emotional regulation skills enable us to live a healthy and well-bala...

Applying The Power Of Choice

You have to recognize that you have the choice in how you react to situations.

This will empower you to work with the challenges that you face in your life: you'll have clarity, focus and a purpose.

The STOPP Technique

... to control your emotions:

  • S – Stop
  • T – Take A Breath
  • O – Observe – your thoughts and feelings
  • P- Pull Back – put in some perspective – what is the bigger picture?
  • P – Practice What Works – Proceed – what is the best thing to do right now?

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Daydreaming about goals
Daydreaming about goals

It is natural to daydream about the things we want - how wonderful it would be if you learned a new language or wrote a novel. But, merely visualising a brighter future won't m...

The "Fantasy Realisation Theory"

It is speculated that people confuse daydreams for reality. The warm emotions from the fantasies lead them to feel as if they'd already met their goals. It results in not putting in the hard work needed for success.

Positive thinking on its own could be counter-productive. Research shows that dieters who fantasized about weight loss are less likely to lose weight. Students who dream of academic success tend to get worse grades than those who don't.

Mental contrasting intervention

Mental contrasting is engaging in a positive fantasy, followed by thinking about the obstacles that might stop you from achieving that goal.

Mental contrasting is a versatile and valuable tool. It is particularly effective when it is combined with implementation intentions ("if-then" plans).

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Happy people vs. miserable people

Happy people engage in more happiness-boosting habits while unhappy people engage in more misery-inducing habits. 

You can choose which habits to cultivate in your life. If ...

Happy People Experience Flow Often
Flow is a state of complete absorption and full involvement in the present moment. 

It is marked by intense concentration, a sense of timelessness, and a loss of self-consciousness. It’s a deeply healing and enjoyable state and one that greatly contributes to our happiness.

Activities of happy people
  • They meditate.
  • They exercise regularly. “Surveys show that exercise may very well be the most effective instant happiness booster of all activities.”
  • They stop and smell the roses. 
  • They spend time with their furry friends.
  • They spend time outside.

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Connection

Having friendships and a sense of belonging is considered a core psychological need and has a big impact on our physical health.

Studies show that loneliness is toxic—it’s more harmful...

Humor

Finding ways to laugh at challenges, stressful situations, and even personal tragedy is one way resilient people cope and grow through misfortune.

Being able to laugh at challenges provides distance and perspective, but does so without denying pain or fear.

Acts of Service

Helping others benefits the giver as much as those on the receiving end. 

Caring for others triggers the biology of courage and creates hope.

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Finding happiness at work

Not only is it possible to find happiness at work, but that doing so is unambiguously good. 

Happier employees do better on all fronts, from day-to-day health to productivi...

Portrait of people who are happy in life
  • They have an easy time feeling good and recovering from adversity
  • they have close, supportive social connections
  • they believe that their presence in the world matters.
4 key pillars of happiness at work
  1. Purpose. Our purpose is a reflection of our core values, and we feel more purposeful at work when our everyday behaviors and decisions are aligned with those values.
  2. Engagement. Prioritise some fun. Take ownership of decisions that affects you. Adopt a flow at work.
  3. Resilience. The ability to handle, adapt to, and productively learn from setbacks, failures, and disappointments.
  4. Kindness. Being kind at work involves treating others with dignity and respect, extending empathy and compassion, practicing gratitude, and constructively managing conflicts.
Count your blessings

Spend 5 to 10 minutes at the end of each day writing in detail about three things that went well that day, large or small, and also describing why you think they happened.

Mental subtraction

You don’t know what you’ve got till its gone. 

Consider the many ways in which important, positive events in your life—such as a job opportunity or educational achievement—could have never taken place, and then reflecting on what your life would be like without them.

Savor

We have a tendency to adapt to pleasurable things—a phenomenon called “hedonic adaptation”—and appreciate them less and less over time. 

We can interrupt this process by trying the Give it Up practice, which requires temporarily giving up pleasurable activities and then coming back to them later, this time with greater anticipation and excitement.

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