Household Chores: The Old Way

Household Chores: The Old Way

Logic dictates that whoever is good at a particular household chore is to do the same, for maximum efficiency. This is known as Division Of Labour in simple economics.

If household chores are done by the one who is able to do them well, then one person ends up doing almost everything.

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A fair and equal division of labour using a method in game theory called ‘I Divide, You Choose’ creates a level playing field while making the person who is not adept at a certain task strive hard to level up the required skill sets.

Example: When dividing a piece of pastry between two kids, if one kid is told to divide the treat in half and the other is provided with an opportunity to choose which half is whose, then the first kid will ensure that the division is fair and equal.

Instead of an ‘us vs them' attitude while dividing housework, a thorough discussion followed by a fair and equal distribution of work is the way forward.

Good, honest communication about which chores are draining one partner and what can be tweaked to be less annoying for them is the key. Unpleasant chores can be done together as a team, with each partner dividing a load of work between the two, making it easier for both of them.

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RELATED IDEAS

Invisible work refers to work that is unpaid, unnoticed and unacknowledged. These tasks include cooking dinner, assisting children with homework, or making a dentist appointment.



Invisible labour also appears in other sectors. For example, doing unpaid work for the "exposure" that could lead to industry connections, or a task outside of your work duties that could give you access to better "opportunities." While it may be true, it is still invisible labour.

Kids are master manipulators. They will play up their charms, pit adults against another and wail loudly in public. It's your job to keep up with them.
Adam Smith: the father of modern economics

Adam Smith was an 18th-century Scottish economist, philosopher, and author. He is considered the father of modern economics.

  • Smith was born in 1723 in Scotland. He studied moral philosophy at the University of Glasgow and enrolled in postgraduate studies at the Balliol College at Oxford University.
  • After returning to Scotland, Smith held a series of public lectures at the University of Edinburgh and earned a professorship at Glasgow University in 1751. Later he earned the position of Chair of Moral Philosophy.
  • In 1763, he accepted a more remunerative position in France. There, Smith counted philosophers David Hume and Voltaire as contemporaries.

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