The Busyness Paradox: Addicted To Being Busy - Deepstash

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Productivity Shame: How To Stop Feeling Like You Haven't Done 'Enough'

The Busyness Paradox: Addicted To Being Busy

  • Personal productivity is not about all-round efficiency, and it is wrong to think about your input as that of a machine in a factory unit.
  • This is further complicated by our mistaken assumption that being in demand means that we are doing a splendid job.
  • We blur our all boundaries between our work and personal life and every minute of the day is to be kept busy as we rush to attend every meeting, cross out every task from the to-do list or to answer every email that we get.

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The Spiral of Productivity Shame

Productivity shame is a feeling that you are not doing enough, whatever the number of hours you are working, or the number of tasks you are crossing off your to-do list. It also means you fe...

Causes of Productivity Shame
  • We link our products to our self-worth, thinking that we need to get more done, and our self-esteem depends upon it.
  • We set unrealistic goals, which can be discouraging for us if we keep on focusing on the end result.
  • We compare ourselves with others, who seemingly are doing better and are more productive.
Overcoming Productivity Shame

  • Disconnect your Self-worth from your achievements.
  • Set realistic, effective goals: The three elements of goal-setting are knowing what you want to achieve, how you're going to get there, and why you want to achieve something. If you have a compelling reason and motivation, go for it.
  • Appreciate progress: Consistent progress aids productivity better than the achieving of goals. 

William Penn

"Time is what we want most, but what we use worst".

William Penn
Time anxiety

Time anxiety is the feeling that you have not done enough to meet your goals or that you're not using the time you do have effectively.

Time anxiety is more than feeling overwhelmed at times - it haunts your days and causes you to procrastinate on essential tasks.

Your relationship with time changes

The irony is the more we focus on the limited time we do have, the more restricted our time feels.

Time had little impact on us as children. We used to spend our days with mostly unstructured games and learning. As we became teenagers, time started to gain importance. As adults, time becomes an essential and scarce resource that we have to attempt to control.

Have one daily priority

Many of us start our mornings with dozens of things we need to get done, but later realize that we haven't crossed any of them off our lists. We did get stuff done, but none of the things we pl...

Make planning a habit

Some mornings we feel motivated to create a to-do list, but that is often the exception. We need to get things done, even when we feel disengaged.

Start by setting the alarm for your daily planning session at the same time every day. Tack your new daily planning session onto an existing habit like drinking your morning coffee.

Align your to-do list with goals
  1. Break down your big goals into daily tasks. You can't add "Get in shape" to your daily to-do list, but you can add "spend 30 minutes on my bike."
  2. Consider your week as a whole. You likely have multiple goals. Some goals benefit from daily activity, while working towards others a few times a week can create momentum.
  3. Add your have-to-do tasks last. We often fill our to-do lists with have-to-do tasks that crowd the whole day. Adding it last forces you to fit your have-to-do tasks around your goal tasks.