Cortisol is the root of anxiety - Deepstash

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Stop Anxiety by Adjusting Expectations

Cortisol is the root of anxiety

We prefer to hold on to old experiences. It helps us make sense of the world: It protects us from touching a fire or eating poison berries. But when the expectations cause anxiety, we can adjust them.

If you get what you expect, your brain releases a bit of dopamine and moves on. If it conflicts, cortisol is released, which motivates us to pay more attention, but it also fuels anxiety.

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