The Three Stages Of Repressed Memory - Deepstash

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Is It Possible to Forget Something That Happened to You in the Past?

The Three Stages Of Repressed Memory

  • If the traumatic condition is extreme, then the memory may not be long term rather they can only be stored as sensations, emotions and reactions.
  • In the trauma which is moderate and bearable, the memories can be stored for the long term and are not much affected.
  • The process of “State-dependent” memory enhances and retrieves the forgotten memory at the current time due to the sensory triggers for a particular situation. Whereas sometimes the memory of the traumatic situations can return through sensations or flashbacks where the person feels to recall the past naturally comparing it to the present.

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